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Tax evasion, intrinsic motivation, and the evolutionary effects of tax reforms

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  • Fabio Lamantia
  • Mario Pezzino
  • Fabio Tramontana

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  • Fabio Lamantia & Mario Pezzino & Fabio Tramontana, 2017. "Tax evasion, intrinsic motivation, and the evolutionary effects of tax reforms," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1707, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:man:sespap:1707
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    File URL: http://hummedia.manchester.ac.uk/schools/soss/economics/discussionpapers/EDP-1707.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Klara Sabirianova Peter, 2009. "Myth and Reality of Flat Tax Reform: Micro Estimates of Tax Evasion Response and Welfare Effects in Russia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 117(3), pages 504-554, June.
    12. Kopel, Michael & Lamantia, Fabio & Szidarovszky, Ferenc, 2014. "Evolutionary competition in a mixed market with socially concerned firms," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 394-409.
    13. James Andreoni & Brian Erard & Jonathan Feinstein, 1998. "Tax Compliance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 818-860, June.
    14. Traxler, Christian, 2010. "Social norms and conditional cooperative taxpayers," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 89-103, March.
    15. Joel Slemrod & Caroline Weber, 2012. "Evidence of the invisible: toward a credibility revolution in the empirical analysis of tax evasion and the informal economy," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 19(1), pages 25-53, February.
    16. Timothy Besley & Torsten Persson, 2014. "Why Do Developing Countries Tax So Little?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 99-120, Fall.
    17. Ross Cressman, 2003. "Evolutionary Dynamics and Extensive Form Games," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262033054, March.
    18. Bischi, G.-I. & Dawid, H. & Kopel, M., 2003. "Gaining the competitive edge using internal and external spillovers: a dynamic analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 2171-2193.
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    21. Bischi, Gian Italo & Lamantia, Fabio & Radi, Davide, 2015. "An evolutionary Cournot model with limited market knowledge," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 219-238.
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    26. Henrik Jacobsen Kleven & Martin B. Knudsen & Claus Thustrup Kreiner & Søren Pedersen & Emmanuel Saez, 2011. "Unwilling or Unable to Cheat? Evidence From a Tax Audit Experiment in Denmark," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(3), pages 651-692, May.
    27. Nadja Dwenger & Henrik Kleven & Imran Rasul & Johannes Rincke, 2016. "Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivations for Tax Compliance: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Germany," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(3), pages 203-232, August.
    28. Allingham, Michael G. & Sandmo, Agnar, 1972. "Income tax evasion: a theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3-4), pages 323-338, November.
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    31. Lago-Peñas, Ignacio & Lago-Peñas, Santiago, 2010. "The determinants of tax morale in comparative perspective: Evidence from European countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 441-453, December.
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    33. Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1974. "Income tax evasion: A theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 201-202, May.
    34. Kountouris, Yiannis & Remoundou, Kyriaki, 2013. "Is there a cultural component in tax morale? Evidence from immigrants in Europe," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 104-119.
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    Cited by:

    1. Domenico De Giovanni & Fabio Lamantia & Mario Pezzino, 2018. "Evolutionary tax evasion and optimal regulation," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1814, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    2. Nordblom, Katarina, 2017. "Tax Morale and Policy Intervention," Working Papers in Economics 711, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

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