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Attitudes towards Economic Risk and the Gender Pay Gap

Author

Listed:
  • Le, Anh T.

    (Curtin University)

  • Miller, Paul W.

    (Curtin University)

  • Slutske, Wendy S.

    (University of Missouri-Columbia)

  • Martin, Nicholas G.

    (Queensland Institute of Medical Research)

Abstract

This paper examines the links between gender differences in attitudes towards economic risk and the gender pay gap. Consistent with the literature on the socio-economic determinants of attitudes towards economic risk, it shows that females are much more risk averse than males. It then extends this research to show that workers with more favorable attitudes towards risk are associated with higher earnings, and that gender differences in attitudes towards economic risk can account for a small, though important, part of the standardized gender pay gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W. & Slutske, Wendy S. & Martin, Nicholas G., 2010. "Attitudes towards Economic Risk and the Gender Pay Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 5393, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5393
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcela V. Parada‐Contzen, 2019. "The Value of a Statistical Life for Risk‐Averse and Risk‐Seeking Individuals," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 39(11), pages 2369-2390, November.
    2. Jetter Michael & Walker Jay K., 2020. "Gender Differences in Performance and Risk-taking among Children, Teenagers, and College Students: Evidence from Jeopardy!," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(2), pages 1-24, April.
    3. Jaanika Meriküll & Pille Mõtsmees, 2017. "Do you get what you ask? The gender gap in desired and realised wages," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(6), pages 893-908, September.
    4. Edin, Per-Anders & Selin, Håkan, 2020. "Financial risk-taking and the gender wage gap," Working Paper Series 2020:16, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    5. Jaanika Meriküll & Pille Mõtsmees, 2017. "Do you get what you ask? The gender gap in desired and realised wages," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(6), pages 893-908, September.
    6. Fouarge, Didier & Kriechel, Ben & Dohmen, Thomas, 2014. "Occupational sorting of school graduates: The role of economic preferences," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 335-351.
    7. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2016. "Biology and Gender in the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 10386, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. María Arrazola & José de Hevia, 2016. "The Gender Wage Gap in Offered, Observed, and Reservation Wages for Spain," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 101-128, October.
    9. Rahmah Ismail & Maryam Farhadi & Chung†Khain Wye, 2017. "Occupational Segregation and Gender Wage Differentials: Evidence from Malaysia," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 381-401, December.
    10. Cho, In Soo, 2011. "Do Gender Differences in Risk Preferences Explain Gender Differences in Labor Supply, Earnings or Occupational Choice?," Staff General Research Papers Archive 34651, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    11. Uwe Jirjahn, 2011. "Gender, Worker Representation and the Profitability of Firms in Germany," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 8(2), pages 281-298, December.
    12. Hazans, Mihails, 2011. "Informal Workers across Europe: Evidence from 30 Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 5871, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Sanjaya, Muhammad Ryan, 2013. "On the source of risk aversion in Indonesia using micro data 2007," Economics Discussion Papers 2013-33, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    14. Wojciech Przychodzen & Fernando Gómez-Bezares, 2021. "CEO–Employee Pay Gap, Productivity and Value Creation," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 14(5), pages 1-17, April.
    15. Jetter, Michael & Walker, Jay K., 2017. "Gender Differences in Competitiveness and Risk-Taking among Children, Teenagers, and College Students: Evidence from Jeopardy!," IZA Discussion Papers 11201, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. Muhammad Ryan SANJAYA, 2013. "Shocks, Physical Characteristics, and Risk Taking Behaviour," Asian Journal of Empirical Research, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(9), pages 1081-1105, September.
    17. Mundaca, Luis & Luth Richter, Jessika, 2015. "Assessing ‘green energy economy’ stimulus packages: Evidence from the U.S. programs targeting renewable energy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 1174-1186.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    wages; gender; risk; wage gap;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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