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Does the Statutory Overtime Premium Discourage Long Workweeks?

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  • Trejo, Stephen

    () (University of Texas at Austin)

Abstract

Using a pooled data set consisting of 20 annual observations on each of eleven major industry groups, I estimate the effects of overtime pay regulation on weekly work schedules. After controlling for workweek trends within industries, the sharp expansions in overtime pay coverage resulting from legislative amendments and Supreme Court decisions produced no discernible impact on overtime hours. This finding is consistent with a model of labor market equilibrium in which straight-time hourly wages adjust to neutralize the statutory overtime premium.

Suggested Citation

  • Trejo, Stephen, 2001. "Does the Statutory Overtime Premium Discourage Long Workweeks?," IZA Discussion Papers 373, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp373
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Trejo, Stephen J, 1991. "The Effects of Overtime Pay Regulation on Worker Compensation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 719-740, September.
    2. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    3. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Stephen J. Trejo, 2000. "The Demand for Hours of Labor: Direct Evidence from California," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 38-47, February.
    4. Parks, Richard W., 1980. "On the estimation of multinomial logit models from relative frequency data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 293-303, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pedro S. Martins, 2016. "Can overtime premium flexibility promote employment? Firm- and worker-level evidence from a labour law reform," Working Papers 72, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
    2. Kawaguchi, Daiji & Naito, Hisahiro & Yokoyama, Izumi, 2017. "Assessing the effects of reducing standard hours: Regression discontinuity evidence from Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 59-76.
    3. Andrew Figura, 2004. "Workweek flexibility and hours variation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-59, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2014. "The effect of overtime regulations on employment," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-89, October.
    5. Pierre Cahuc & Stéphane Carcillo, 2014. "The Detaxation of Overtime Hours: Lessons from the French Experiment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(2), pages 361-400.
    6. Martins, Pedro S., 2017. "Economic effects of overtime premium flexibility: Firm- and worker-level evidence from a law reform," GLO Discussion Paper Series 102, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    compensating differential; work hours; Overtime;

    JEL classification:

    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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