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Gender Differences in Charitable Giving

Author

Listed:
  • Piper, Greg

    () (National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO))

  • Schnepf, Sylke V.

    () (European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre)

Abstract

The predominant part of the literature states that women are more likely to donate to charitable causes but men are more generous in terms of the amount given. The last result generally derives from the focus on mean amount given. This paper examines gender differences in giving focusing on the distribution of amounts donated and the probability of giving using UK micro-data on individual giving to charitable causes. Results indicate that most women are more generous than men also in terms of the amounts donated. Quantile regression analysis shows that this pattern is robust if we take into account gender differences in individual characteristics such as household structure, education and income. The analysis also examines differences in gender preferences for varying charitable causes. For most of the paper, separate analyses are presented for single and married/cohabiting people, highlighting the very different gender patterns of giving behaviour found in the two groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Piper, Greg & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2007. "Gender Differences in Charitable Giving," IZA Discussion Papers 3242, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3242
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2005. "Do Husbands and Wives Pool Their Resources?: Further Evidence," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
    2. Lundberg, S.J. & Pollak, R.A. & Wales, T.J., 1994. "Do Husbands and Wives Pool Their Resources? Evidence from U.K. Child Benefit," Working Papers 94-6, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    3. Ben-Ner, Avner & Kong, Fanmin & Putterman, Louis, 2004. "Share and share alike? Gender-pairing, personality, and cognitive ability as determinants of giving," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 581-589, October.
    4. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731, April.
    5. Bolton, Gary E. & Katok, Elena, 1995. "An experimental test for gender differences in beneficent behavior," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 48(3-4), pages 287-292, June.
    6. Micklewright, John & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2007. "Who Gives for Overseas Development?," IZA Discussion Papers 3057, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Lacetera, Nicola & Macis, Mario, 2010. "Do all material incentives for pro-social activities backfire? The response to cash and non-cash incentives for blood donations," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 738-748, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    charitable donations; gender differences;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship

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