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The Formal Sector Wage Premium and Firm Size

Author

Listed:
  • El Badaoui, Eliane

    () (University Paris Ouest-Nanterre)

  • Strobl, Eric

    () (Aix-Marseille University)

  • Walsh, Frank

    () (University College Dublin)

Abstract

We show theoretically that when larger firms pay higher wages and are more likely to be caught defaulting on labour taxes, then large high-wage firms will be in the formal sector and small low-wage firms will be in the informal sector. The formal sector wage premium is thus just a firm size wage differential. Using data from the South African labour force survey we illustrate that firm size is indeed the key variable determining whether a formal sector premium exists.

Suggested Citation

  • El Badaoui, Eliane & Strobl, Eric & Walsh, Frank, 2007. "The Formal Sector Wage Premium and Firm Size," IZA Discussion Papers 3145, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3145
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Costas Meghir & Renata Narita & Jean-Marc Robin, 2015. "Wages and Informality in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(4), pages 1509-1546, April.
    2. Olivier Bargain & Prudence Kwenda, 2014. "The Informal Sector Wage Gap: New Evidence Using Quantile Estimations on Panel Data," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(1), pages 117-153.
    3. Binnur Balkan & Semih Tumen, 2016. "Firm-Size Wage Gaps along the Formal-Informal Divide: Theory and Evidence," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 235-266, April.
    4. Falco, Paolo & Kerr, Andrew & Rankin, Neil & Sandefur, Justin & Teal, Francis, 2011. "The returns to formality and informality in urban Africa," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages 23-31.
    5. Haanwinckel, Daniel & Soares, Rodrigo R., 2016. "Workforce Composition, Productivity, and Labor Regulations in a Compensating Differentials Theory of Informality," IZA Discussion Papers 9951, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Siba, Eyerusalem, 2015. "Returns to Physical Capital in Ethiopia: Comparative Analysis of Formal and Informal Firms," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 215-229.
    7. Ana Barufi & Eduardo Haddad & Peter Nijkamp, 2016. "A comprehensive analysis of the wage curve in Brazil: Non-linearities, urban size, and the spatial dimension," ERSA conference papers ersa16p279, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Bargain, Olivier & El Badaoui, Eliane & Magejo, Prudence & Strobl, Eric & Walsh, Frank, 2012. "The Formal Sector Wage Premium and Firm Size for Self-employed Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 6604, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Simon COMMANDER & Natalia ISACHENKOVA & Yulia RODIONOVA, 2013. "Informal employment dynamics in Ukraine: An analytical model of informality in transition economies," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 152(3-4), pages 445-467, December.
    10. Cano-Urbina, Javier, 2015. "The role of the informal sector in the early careers of less-educated workers," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 33-55.
    11. Erol Taymaz, 2009. "Informality and Productivity: Productivity Differentials between Formal and Informal Firms in Turkey," ERC Working Papers 0901, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Mar 2009.
    12. Olivier Bargain & Prudence Kwenda, 2009. "The Informal Sector Wage Gap: New Evidence Using Quantile Regressions on Panel Data," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 09-06, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
    13. Michiel Gerritse & Ana Isabel Moreno-Monroy, 2012. "Informal Sector and Manufacturing Location: In Search of the Missing Links," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 179-201, June.
    14. Charlot, Olivier & Malherbet, Franck & Terra, Cristina, 2015. "Informality in developing economies: Regulation and fiscal policies," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 1-27.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    informal sector; wage premium; firm size;

    JEL classification:

    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets

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