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The COVID-19 Pandemic in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: The Labor Supply Impact by Gender

Author

Listed:
  • Viollaz, Mariana

    (CEDLAS-UNLP)

  • Salazar-Saenz, Mauricio

    (Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio))

  • Flabbi, Luca

    (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

  • Bustelo, Monserrat

    (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Bosch, Mariano

    (Inter-American Development Bank)

Abstract

We study the labor supply impact of the COVID-19 pandemic by gender in four Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries: Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic, and Mexico. To identify the impact, we compare labor market stocks and labor market flows over four quarters for a set of balanced panel samples of comparable workers before and after the pandemic. We find that the pandemic has negatively affected the labor market status of both men and women, but that the effect is significantly stronger for women, magnifying the already large gender gaps that characterize LAC countries. The main channel through which this stronger impact is taking place is the increase in child care work affecting women with school-age children.

Suggested Citation

  • Viollaz, Mariana & Salazar-Saenz, Mauricio & Flabbi, Luca & Bustelo, Monserrat & Bosch, Mariano, 2022. "The COVID-19 Pandemic in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: The Labor Supply Impact by Gender," IZA Discussion Papers 15091, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp15091
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth A. Couch & Robert W. Fairlie & Huanan Xu, 2022. "The evolving impacts of the COVID‐19 pandemic on gender inequality in the US labor market: The COVID motherhood penalty," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 60(2), pages 485-507, April.
    2. Bosch, Mariano & Maloney, William F., 2010. "Comparative analysis of labor market dynamics using Markov processes: An application to informality," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 621-631, August.
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    4. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, Care and Gender during the COVID‐19 Crisis," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(3), pages 623-651, September.
    5. Adams-Prassl, Abi & Boneva, Teodora & Golin, Marta & Rauh, Christopher, 2020. "Inequality in the impact of the coronavirus shock: Evidence from real time surveys," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 189(C).
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    9. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni & Nicolás Badaracco & Joaquín Serrano, 2015. "Female Labor Force Participation in Latin America: Evidence of Deceleration," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0181, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
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    11. Lídia Farré & Yarine Fawaz & Libertad González & Jennifer Graves, 2022. "Gender Inequality in Paid and Unpaid Work During Covid‐19 Times," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 68(2), pages 323-347, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Duran-Vanegas, 2022. "Gender Gaps in the Labor Market Effects of COVID-19: Evidence for Mexico," Trinity Economics Papers tep0422, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised May 2022.
    2. Berniell, Inés & Gasparini, Leonardo & Marchionni, Mariana & Viollaz, Mariana, 2023. "Lucky women in unlucky cohorts," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 161(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor supply; labor market transitions; COVID-19; gender differentials; Latin American and Caribbean countries;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J46 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Informal Labor Market
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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