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Child Labor and the Arrival of Refugees: Evidence from Tanzania

Author

Listed:
  • Kofol, Chiara

    () (ZEF, University of Bonn)

  • Naghsh Nejad, Maryam

    () (University of Technology, Sydney)

Abstract

The impact of hosting refugees on child labor in host countries is unclear. This paper estimates both the short and the long term consequences of hosting refugees fleeing from the genocides of Rwanda and Burundi in the Kagera region of Tanzania between 1991 and 2004. The study uses longitudinal data from the Kagera Health and Development Survey. Using the exogenous nature of refugee settlement in Kagera due to geographic and logistical reasons, we find the causal impact of hosting refugees on child labor and children's schooling outcomes. The results suggest that the impact of hosting refugees on children living in Kagera decreases child labor in the short run (between 1991 and 1994), but increases it in the longer run (1991–2004). The results are heterogeneous across gender and age. The study aims at understanding the mechanisms behind the variation in child labor outcome due to the forced migration shock exploring various channels.

Suggested Citation

  • Kofol, Chiara & Naghsh Nejad, Maryam, 2017. "Child Labor and the Arrival of Refugees: Evidence from Tanzania," IZA Discussion Papers 11242, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11242
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    forced migration; child labor; school attendance; human capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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