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Women Make Houses, Women Make Homes

Author

Listed:
  • Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude

    () (Dalhousie University)

  • Khamis, Melanie

    () (Wesleyan University)

  • Yuksel, Mutlu

    () (Dalhousie University)

Abstract

This paper examines the persistent effects of historical labor market institutions and policies on women's long-term labor market outcomes. We quantify these enduring effects by exploring quasi-experimental variation in Germany's post-World War II mandatory reconstruction policy, which compelled women to work in the rubble removal and reconstruction process. Using difference-in-differences and instrumental variable approaches, we find that mandatory employment during the postwar era generated persistent adverse effects on women's long-term labor market outcomes. An increase in marriage and fertility rates in the postwar era and a physical and mental exhaustion associated with manual labor are some of the direct and indirect channels potentially explaining our results.

Suggested Citation

  • Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude & Khamis, Melanie & Yuksel, Mutlu, 2017. "Women Make Houses, Women Make Homes," IZA Discussion Papers 10830, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10830
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mevlude Akbulut-Yuksel, 2014. "Children of War: The Long-Run Effects of Large-Scale Physical Destruction and Warfare on Children," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(3), pages 634-662.
    2. Frijters, Paul & Haisken-DeNew, John P. & Shields, Michael A., 2011. "The Increasingly Mixed Proportional Hazard Model: An Application to Socioeconomic Status, Health Shocks, and Mortality," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 29(2), pages 271-281.
    3. David A. Jaeger & Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde & Holger Bonin, 2010. "Direct Evidence on Risk Attitudes and Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(3), pages 684-689, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    female labor supply; historical institutions; occupational choice;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • N34 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: 1913-

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