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Financial Literacy and Attitudes to Redistribution

Author

Listed:
  • Montagnoli, Alberto

    () (University of Sheffield)

  • Moro, Mirko

    () (University of Stirling)

  • Panos, Georgios A.

    () (University of Glasgow)

  • Wright, Robert E.

    () (University of Strathclyde)

Abstract

This study combines novel financial-literacy data with measures of attitudes to redistribution from the British Election Study. We find a significant negative relationship between financial literacy and attitudes in favour of government intervention for income redistribution. The effect is robust to several specifications, samples, longitudinal models and instrumental variable regressions. Falsification tests show that these results are independent of generic attitudes towards other types of inequality/discrimination, e.g. based on gender, race or sexual orientation. An inquiry into the mechanisms of the effect indicates that the homo oeconomicus effect does not exert an impact on attitudes to redistribution for the less financially literate.

Suggested Citation

  • Montagnoli, Alberto & Moro, Mirko & Panos, Georgios A. & Wright, Robert E., 2017. "Financial Literacy and Attitudes to Redistribution," IZA Discussion Papers 10633, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10633
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    Cited by:

    1. Fornero, Elsa & Lo Prete, Anna, 2017. "Voting in the Aftermath of a Pension Reform: The Role of Financial Literacy," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201723, University of Turin.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial literacy; redistribution; inequality; attitudes; Great Britain;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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