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Mobbing and workers' health: an empirical analysis for Spain

Author

Listed:
  • M. Angeles Carnero Fernández

    () (Universidad de Alicante)

  • Blanca Martínez

    (Universidad de Alicante)

  • Rocío Sánchez Mangas

    (Dpto. Análisis Económico: Economía Cuantitativa)

Abstract

his paper analyzes empirically the impact of mobbing on the health of workers in Spain. Based on the Sixth Spanish Survey on Working Conditions, we first describe the differences in health among mobbed and not mobbed workers, sing two different indicators: the worker's self-perception that work affects health and the presence of bad health symptoms. The descriptive evidence shows that mobbing victims perform worse on such health indicators. We estimate the effect of being mobbed on the probability of suffering from health problems, taking into account the potential endogeneity of mobbing. Our estimates show that being a mobbing victim increases significantly the probability of having bad health, independently on the indicator used. Moreover, when bad health is measured by the perception indicator, we find that the effect of mobbing is underestimated if endogeneity is not accounted for.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Angeles Carnero Fernández & Blanca Martínez & Rocío Sánchez Mangas, 2010. "Mobbing and workers' health: an empirical analysis for Spain," Working Papers. Serie AD 2010-30, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  • Handle: RePEc:ivi:wpasad:2010-30
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ivie.es/downloads/docs/wpasad/wpasad-2010-30.pdf
    File Function: Fisrt version / Primera version, 2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. M. Angeles Carnero & Blanca Martinez & Rocio Sanchez-Mangas, 2010. "Mobbing and its determinants: the case of Spain," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(29), pages 3777-3787.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    bullying at workplace; moral harassment;

    JEL classification:

    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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