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Unemployment and Labor Force Participation in Japan

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Abstract

This paper studies a long-run relationship between the labor force participation rate and the unemployment rate in Japan. By using cointegration analysis, we demonstrate that there exists a long-run relationship between the two variables for male workers but not for female workers. Furthermore, using labor force data by age group, we find the added-worker effect for young males and the discouraged worker effect for middle-aged and old male groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Makoto Kakinaka & Hiroaki Miyamoto, 2011. "Unemployment and Labor Force Participation in Japan," Working Papers EMS_2011_15, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
  • Handle: RePEc:iuj:wpaper:ems_2011_15
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    File URL: http://www.iuj.ac.jp/workingpapers/index.cfm?File=EMS_2011_15.pdf
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    4. Österholm, Pär, 2010. "Unemployment and labour-force participation in Sweden," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(3), pages 205-208, March.
    5. Lin, Ching-Yang & Miyamoto, Hiroaki, 2012. "Gross worker flows and unemployment dynamics in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 44-61.
    6. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    7. Elliott, Graham, 1999. "Efficient Tests for a Unit Root When the Initial Observation Is Drawn from Its Unconditional Distribution," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 767-783, August.
    8. Brian Bell & James Smith, 2002. "On gross worker flows in the United Kingdom: evidence from the Labour Force Survey," Bank of England working papers 160, Bank of England.
    9. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
    10. Perron, Pierre & Rodriguez, Gabriel, 2003. "GLS detrending, efficient unit root tests and structural change," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 1-27, July.
    11. Marika Karanassou & Dennis J. Snower, 2004. "Unemployment Invariance," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(3), pages 297-317, August.
    12. Emerson, Jamie, 2011. "Unemployment and labor force participation in the United States," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(3), pages 203-206, June.
    13. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-1580, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sibel Cengiz & Afsin Sahin, 2014. "Modelling nonlinear behavior of labor force participation rate by STAR: An application for Turkey," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 7(1), pages 113-127, April.
    2. Aysit Tansel & Zeynel Abidin Ozdemir, 2016. "Unemployment Invariance Hypothesis, Added and Discouraged Worker Effects in Canada?," ERC Working Papers 1717, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Dec 2017.
    3. Tansel, Aysit & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin & Aksoy, Emre, 2016. "Does the Unemployment Invariance Hypothesis Hold for Canada?," IZA Discussion Papers 10178, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Tansel, Aysit & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin & Aksoy, Emre, 2016. "Does Unemployment Invariance Hypothesis Hold for Canada?," MPRA Paper 72869, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Aysit Tansel & Zeynel Abidin Ozdemir & Emre Aksoy, 2016. "Does Unemployment Invariance Hypothesis Hold for Canada?," Working Papers 2016/3, Turkish Economic Association.
    6. Ozerkek, Y., 2013. "Unemployment And Labor Force Participation: A Panel Cointegration Analysis For European Countries," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 13(1), pages 67-76.
    7. Mercy Laita Palamuleni, 2017. "The Unemployment Invariant Hypothesis: Heterogenous Panel Cointegration Evidence From U.S. State Level Data," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 414-419.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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