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Evolution of Worker-Employer Networks and Behaviors Under Alternative Non-Employment Benefits: An Agent-Based Computational Approach

  • Pingle, Mark
  • Tesfatsion, Leigh

This study uses an agent-based computational experiments to examine the effects of a non-employment payment on network formation and work-site behaviors among workers and employers participating in a sequential employment game with incomplete contracts. Findings are compared with those obtained for a parallel labor market experiment conducted with human subjects. Related work can be accessed at: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/tnghome.htm

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File URL: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/alabmplt.pdf
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Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 10376.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2003
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Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:10376
Contact details of provider: Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
Phone: +1 515.294.6741
Fax: +1 515.294.0221
Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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  1. David McFadzean & Deron Stewart & Leigh Tesfatsion, 2000. "A Computational Laboratory for Evolutionary Trade Networks," Computational Economics 0004004, EconWPA.
  2. Freeman, Richard B., 1998. "War of the models: Which labour market institutions for the 21st century?1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 1-24, March.
  3. W. Bentley MacLeod & James Malcomson, 1997. "Motivation and Markets," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 339., Boston College Department of Economics.
  4. David MCFADZEAN & Leigh TESFATSION, 1996. "A C++ Platform For The Evolution Of Trade Networks," Economic Report 39, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
  5. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2000. "Hysteresis in an Evolutionary Labor Market with Adaptive Search," Computational Economics 0004003, EconWPA.
  6. Richard Layard & Stephen Nickell, 1998. "Labour Market Institutions and Economic Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0407, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2002. "Agent-Based Computational Economics," Computational Economics 0203001, EconWPA, revised 15 Aug 2002.
  8. Daron Acemoglu & Robert Shimer, 1999. "Productivity Gains from Unemployment Insurance," Working papers 99-29, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  9. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1997. "A Trade Network Game with Endogenous Partner Selection," Staff General Research Papers 1680, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  10. Hamermesh, Daniel S., 1999. "LEEping into the future of labor economics: the research potential of linking employer and employee data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 25-41, March.
  11. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1998. "Preferential Partner Selection in Evolutionary Labor Markets: A Study in Agent-Based Computational Economics," Staff General Research Papers 4063, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  12. Alvin E. Roth, 2002. "The Economist as Engineer: Game Theory, Experimentation, and Computation as Tools for Design Economics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1341-1378, July.
  13. Joel L. Schrag, 1999. "First Impressions Matter: A Model Of Confirmatory Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 37-82, February.
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