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Structure, Behavior, and Market Power in an Evolutionary Labor Market with Adaptive Search

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  • Tesfatsion, Leigh S.

Abstract

This study uses an agent-based computational labor market framework to experimentally study the relationship between job capacity, job concentration, and market power. Job capacity is measured by the ratio of potential job openings to potential work orders, and job concentration is measured by the ratio of work suppliers to employers. For each experimental treatment, work suppliers and employers repeatedly seek preferred worksite partners based on continually updated expected utility, engage in efficiency-wage worksite interactions modelled as prisoner's dilemma games, and evolve their worksite behaviors over time. The main finding is that job capacity consistently trumps job concentration when it comes to predicting the relative ability of work suppliers and employers to exercise market power. Related work can be accessed here: http://www2.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/tnghome.htm

Suggested Citation

  • Tesfatsion, Leigh S., 2009. "Structure, Behavior, and Market Power in an Evolutionary Labor Market with Adaptive Search," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1681, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:1681
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1995. "A Trade Network Game with Endogenous Partner Selection," ISU General Staff Papers 199505010700001034, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. McFadzean, David & Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1999. "A C++ Platform for the Evolution of Trade Networks," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 14(1-2), pages 109-134, October.
    3. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1999. "Hysteresis In An Evolutionary Labor Market With Adaptive Search," Economic Reports 18189, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1998. "Preferential Partner Selection in Evolutionary Labor Markets: A Study in Agent-Based Computational Economics," Staff General Research Papers Archive 2048, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Leigh TESFATSION, 1995. "How Economists Can Get Alife," Economic Report 37, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
    6. Ashlock, Dan & Smucker, Mark & Stanley, E. Ann & Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1994. "Preferential Partner Selection in an Evolutionary Study of Prisoner's Dilemma," ISU General Staff Papers 199409010700001033, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Roth, Alvin E. & Sotomayor, Marilda, 1992. "Two-sided matching," Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications, in: R.J. Aumann & S. Hart (ed.), Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 16, pages 485-541, Elsevier.
    8. Sargent, Thomas J., 1993. "Bounded Rationality in Macroeconomics: The Arne Ryde Memorial Lectures," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288695.
    9. Jean Tirole, 1988. "The Theory of Industrial Organization," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262200716.
    10. Ariel Rubinstein & Asher Wolinsky, 1990. "Decentralized Trading, Strategic Behaviour and the Walrasian Outcome," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(1), pages 63-78.
    11. Bresnahan, Timothy F., 1989. "Empirical studies of industries with market power," Handbook of Industrial Organization, in: R. Schmalensee & R. Willig (ed.), Handbook of Industrial Organization, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 17, pages 1011-1057, Elsevier.
    12. Matthew Rabin & Joel L. Schrag, 1999. "First Impressions Matter: A Model of Confirmatory Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 37-82.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    market power; agent-based computational economics; evolutionary game; Labor market dynamics; job capacity; job concentration; adaptive search; networks; endogenous interactions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C6 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance

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