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A C++ Platform for the Evolution of Trade Networks

Author

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  • McFadzean, David
  • Tesfatsion, Leigh

Abstract

This paper presents a general C++ platform for the implementation of a trade network game (TNG) that combines evolutionary game play with preferential partner selection. In the TNG, successive generations of resource constrained traders choose and refuse trade partners on the basis of continually updated expected payoffs, engage in risky trades modelled as two-person games, and evolve their trade strategies over time. The modular design of the TNG platform facilitates experimentation with alternative specifications for market structure, trade partner matching, trading, expectation formation, and trade strategy evolution. The TNG platform can be used to study the evolutionary implications of these specifications at three different levels: individual trader attributes, trade network formation, and social welfare. Citation Copyright 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Suggested Citation

  • McFadzean, David & Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1999. "A C++ Platform for the Evolution of Trade Networks," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 14(1-2), pages 109-134, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:compec:v:14:y:1999:i:1-2:p:109-34
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dan Ashlock & Mark D. Smucker & E. Ann Stanley & Leigh Tesfatsion, 1995. "Preferential Partner Selection in an Evolutionary Study of Prisoner's Dilemma," Game Theory and Information 9501002, EconWPA, revised 20 Jan 1995.
    2. Stanley, E.A. & Ashlock, Daniel & Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1994. "Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma with Choice and Refusal of Partners," Staff General Research Papers Archive 11180, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Roth, Alvin E. & Sotomayor, Marilda, 1992. "Two-sided matching," Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications,in: R.J. Aumann & S. Hart (ed.), Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 16, pages 485-541 Elsevier.
    4. Leigh TESFATSION, 1995. "A Trade Network Game With Endogenous Partner Selection," Economic Report 36, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
    5. Leigh TESFATSION, 1995. "How Economists Can Get Alife," Economic Report 37, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
    6. Alan P. Kirman, 1992. "Whom or What Does the Representative Individual Represent?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 117-136, Spring.
    7. Ulrich Witt, 2006. "Evolutionary Economics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2006-05, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    8. Friedman, Daniel, 1991. "Evolutionary Games in Economics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(3), pages 637-666, May.
    9. Richard R. Nelson, 1995. "Recent Evolutionary Theorizing about Economic Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 48-90, March.
    10. Joshua M. Epstein & Robert L. Axtell, 1996. "Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science from the Bottom Up," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550253, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Neugart, Michael, 2006. "Labor market policy evaluation with an agent-based model," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment SP I 2006-113, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Mark Pingle & Leigh Tesfatsion, 2004. "Evolution Of Worker-Employer Networks And Behaviors Under Alternative Non-Employment Benefits: An Agent-Based Computational Study," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Industry And Labor Dynamics The Agent-Based Computational Economics Approach, chapter 8, pages 129-163 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    3. Leigh S. Tesfatsion, "undated". "An Evolutionary Trade Network Game with Preferential Partner Selection," Computing in Economics and Finance 1996 _057, Society for Computational Economics.
    4. Tomas Klos, 1999. "Governance and Matching," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 341, Society for Computational Economics.
    5. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2000. "Agent-Based Computational Economics: A Brief Guide to the Literature," Computational Economics 0004001, EconWPA.
    6. Tesfatsion, Leigh S., 1998. "Teaching Agent-Based Computational Economics to Graduate Students," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1199, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Leigh Tesfatsion, 1998. "Ex Ante Capacity Effects in Evolutionary Labor Markets with Adaptive Search," Labor and Demography 9811003, EconWPA.
    8. Tomas Klos, "undated". "Decentralized Interaction and Co-adaptation in the Repeated Prisoner's Dilemma," Computing in Economics and Finance 1997 88, Society for Computational Economics.
    9. Leigh TESFATSION, 1995. "How Economists Can Get Alife," Economic Report 37, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
    10. Leigh TESFATSION, 1995. "A Trade Network Game With Endogenous Partner Selection," Economic Report 36, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
    11. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 2001. "Structure, behavior, and market power in an evolutionary labor market with adaptive search," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 419-457, March.
    12. Leigh Tesfatsion, 1999. "Market Power Effects on Worker-Employer Network Formation in Evolutionary Labor Markets with Adaptive Search," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 543, Society for Computational Economics.
    13. repec:dgr:rugsom:97b33 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Pingle, Mark & Tesfatsion, Leigh, 2003. "Evolution of Worker-Employer Networks and Behaviors Under Alternative Non-Employment Benefits: An Agent-Based Computational Approach," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10376, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    15. Klos, Tomas B. & Nooteboom, Bart, 2001. "Agent-based computational transaction cost economics," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 503-526, March.
    16. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2000. "Hysteresis in an Evolutionary Labor Market with Adaptive Search," Computational Economics 0004003, EconWPA.
    17. Tesfatsion, Leigh S., 1998. "Gale-Shapley Matching in an Evolutionary Trade Network Game," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1230, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    18. Mark Pingle and Leigh Tesfatsion, 2001. "Unemployment Insurance and the Evolution of Worker-Employer\n Cooperation: Experiments with Real and Artificial Agents," Computing in Economics and Finance 2001 279, Society for Computational Economics.
    19. Halkos, George & Tsilika, Kyriaki, 2016. "Assessing classical input output structures with trade networks: A graph theory approach," MPRA Paper 72511, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. George E. Halkos & Kyriaki D. Tsilika, 2016. "Trading Structures for Regional Economies in CAS Software," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 48(3), pages 523-533, October.
    21. repec:dgr:rugsom:99b41 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. repec:kap:compec:v:51:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10614-016-9624-x is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C6 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling
    • D - Microeconomics
    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance
    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior

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