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Differences in Initial Training and Wages of Japanese Engineering and Retailing Companies - Who Pays for Higher Training Costs?

Author

Listed:
  • Uschi Backes-Gellner

    (Department of Business Administration, University of Zurich)

  • Shiho Futagami

    (Yokohama National University)

  • Silvia Teuber

    () (Department of Business Administration, University of Zurich)

  • Andrea Willi

    (Department of Business Administration, University of Zurich)

Abstract

The optimal human resource and skill development strategy is one important factor of economic success. This paper, therefore, analyzes industry-specific differences in the training provision between engineering and retailing companies in Japan and focuses in particular on the initial training provision for intermediate skills at the firm level. Based on 11 in-depth interviews in the retailing and the engineering sector in Japan, we find that gross training costs per basic trainee are significantly higher in engineering than in retailing. However, not only the engineering companies, but also their employees bear higher costs than their counterparts in retailing. The absolute and relative entrance wages for production employees are significantly lower than the entrance wages of employees in sale. Even though wages in engineering increase significantly stronger within the first five years, the absolute and relative wages in engineering remain still significantly lower. The results relate to the qualification levels of new trainees and the career paths.

Suggested Citation

  • Uschi Backes-Gellner & Shiho Futagami & Silvia Teuber & Andrea Willi, 2013. "Differences in Initial Training and Wages of Japanese Engineering and Retailing Companies - Who Pays for Higher Training Costs?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0090, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0090
    as

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    File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0090_lhwpaper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Loewenstein, Mark A & Spletzer, James R, 1998. "Dividing the Costs and Returns to General Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 142-171, January.
    2. Rita Asplund, 2005. "The Provision and Effects of Company Training: A Brief Review of the Literature," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 31, pages 47-73.
    3. Booth, Alison L & Zoega, Gylfi, 2000. "Why Do Firms Invest in General Training? 'Good' Firms and 'Bad' Firms as a Source of Monopsony Power," CEPR Discussion Papers 2536, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Mark A. Loewenstein & James R. Spletzer, 1999. "General and Specific Training: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(4), pages 710-733.
    5. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
    6. Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2002. "Who Pays for General Training? New Evidence for British Men and Women," IZA Discussion Papers 486, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Masako Kurosawa, 2001. "The Extent and Impact of Enterprise Training: The Case of Kitakyushu City," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 52(2), pages 224-242.
    8. Gary S. Becker, 1975. "Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, with Special Reference to Education, Second Edition," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck75-1.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Training in Japan; Intermediate skills; Engineering and Retailing; Wages;

    JEL classification:

    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L64 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Other Machinery; Business Equipment; Armaments
    • L81 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Retail and Wholesale Trade; e-Commerce

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