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Grandparents and women's participation in the labor market

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  • Paula Albuquerque
  • José Passos

Abstract

The conciliation of work and family life is a challenge to most women. In some countries, although not in southern Europe, women make significant use of part-time schedules as a way of balancing work and family life. Informal care, typically care by grandparents, is an alternative. It is cheap, trustworthy, and possibly compatible with non-standard labor schedules. In this paper we investigate how childcare by grandparents affects the probability of working of mothers in southern European countries. We empirically evaluate the verification and the significance of such an effect, accounting for a potentially endogenous grandparent-caring status.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula Albuquerque & José Passos, 2010. "Grandparents and women's participation in the labor market," Working Papers Department of Economics 2010/16, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
  • Handle: RePEc:ise:isegwp:wp162010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Josefina Posadas, 2012. "Grandparents as Child Care Providers : Factors to Consider When Designing Child Care Policies," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17056, The World Bank.
    2. Lusi Liao & Sasiwimon Warunsiri Paweenawat, 2019. "Alternative Boomerang Kids, Intergenerational Co-residence, and Maternal Labor Supply," PIER Discussion Papers 108, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised May 2019.

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    Keywords

    labor market; women; childcare; grandparents; ageing.;
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