IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pui/dpaper/108.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Alternative Boomerang Kids, Intergenerational Co-residence, and Maternal Labor Supply

Author

Listed:
  • Lusi Liao

    (University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce)

  • Sasiwimon Warunsiri Paweenawat

    (University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce)

Abstract

This study investigates the boomerang phenomenon among adult children in Thailand. We estimate the effect of having children on co-residence between parents and adult children using Socio-Economic Survey panel data. We find that adult children who have moved out tend to move back in with their parents after having children to save time and money on childcare. The presence of young children increases the likelihood of intergenerational co-residence by over 30%. This study is the first to provide empirical evidence of boomerang kids in an Asian context, which is distinctive compared with Western countries. The relationship between intergenerational co-residence and the maternal labor supply is also examined using the instrumental variable approach based on the cross-sectional Labor Force Survey, which has data covering over 30 years. Our results show that co-residence increases the female labor supply by 21% and also extends women's working hours by 10 hours.

Suggested Citation

  • Lusi Liao & Sasiwimon Warunsiri Paweenawat, 2019. "Alternative Boomerang Kids, Intergenerational Co-residence, and Maternal Labor Supply," PIER Discussion Papers 108, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised May 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:pui:dpaper:108
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.pier.or.th/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/pier_dp_108.pdf
    File Function: Published version, 2019
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eva Garcia-Moran & Zoe Kuehn, 2017. "With Strings Attached: Grandparent-Provided Child Care and Female Labor Market Outcomes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 23, pages 80-98, January.
    2. McElroy, Marjorie B, 1985. "The Joint Determination of Household Membership and Market Work: The Case of Young Men," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(3), pages 293-316, July.
    3. Nakamura, Jiro & Ueda, Atsuko, 1999. "On the Determinants of Career Interruption by Childbirth among Married Women in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 73-89, March.
    4. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 1-21, May.
    5. Fuqin Bian & John Logan & Yanjie Bian, 1998. "Intergenerational relations in urban China: Proximity, contact, and help to parents," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(1), pages 115-124, February.
    6. Daniela Del Boca, 2002. "The effect of child care and part time opportunities on participation and fertility decisions in Italy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 549-573.
    7. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & Rachel Connelly & Lan Chen & Lixin Tang, 2011. "Childcare, Eldercare, and Labor Force Participation of Married Women in Urban China, 1982–2000," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(2), pages 261-294.
    8. repec:taf:applec:v:50:y:2018:i:5:p:527-544 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Lusi Liao & Sasiwimon Warunsiri Paweenawat, 2018. "Labour Supply of Married Women in Thailand: 1985-2016," PIER Discussion Papers 88, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Jun 2018.
    10. Ke Shen & Ping Yan & Yi Zeng, 2016. "Coresidence with elderly parents and female labor supply in China," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(23), pages 645-670, September.
    11. Arpino, Bruno & Pronzato, Chiara & Tavares, Lara Patrício, 2010. "All in the family: informal childcare and mothers' labour market participation," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    12. Goldin, Claudia, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment, Education, and Family," Scholarly Articles 2943933, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    13. Bruno Arpino & Chiara Pronzato & Lara Tavares, 2014. "The Effect of Grandparental Support on Mothers’ Labour Market Participation: An Instrumental Variable Approach," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 369-390, November.
    14. Landmann, Andreas & Seitz, Helke & Steiner, Susan, 2017. "Intergenerational Coresidence and Female Labour Supply," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168282, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    15. Masaru Sasaki, 2002. "The Causal Effect of Family Structure on Labor Force Participation among Japanese Married Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(2), pages 429-440.
    16. Dettling, Lisa J. & Hsu, Joanne W., 2014. "Returning to the Nest: Debt and Parental Co-residence Among Young Adults," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-80, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    17. repec:eee:labeco:v:54:y:2018:i:c:p:225-236 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Compton, Janice & Pollak, Robert A., 2014. "Family proximity, childcare, and women’s labor force attachment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 72-90.
    19. Paula Albuquerque & José Passos, 2010. "Grandparents and women's participation in the labor market," Working Papers Department of Economics 2010/16, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    20. Kerry Richter & Chai Podhisita & Aphichat Chamratrithirong & Kusol Soonthorndhada, 1994. "The impact of child care on fertility in urban Thailand," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(4), pages 651-662, November.
    21. Emily E. Wiemers, 2014. "The Effect of Unemployment on Household Composition and Doubling Up," Working Papers 2014_05, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    22. Posadas, Josefina & Vidal-Fernández, Marian, 2012. "Grandparents' Childcare and Female Labor Force Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 6398, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    23. Emily Wiemers, 2014. "The Effect of Unemployment on Household Composition and Doubling Up," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(6), pages 2155-2178, December.
    24. T. Paul Schultz, 1990. "Testing the Neoclassical Model of Family Labor Supply and Fertility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(4), pages 599-634.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Boomerang Kids; Intergenerational Co-residence; Informal Childcare; Maternal Labor Supply; Asia; Thailand;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C26 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pui:dpaper:108. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (PIER). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/pierbth.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.