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The Effect of Unemployment on Household Composition and Doubling Up

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  • Emily E. Wiemers

Abstract

Doubling up with family and friends is one way in which individuals and families can cope with job loss but there is still relatively little work on the extent to which people use co-residence to weather a spell of unemployment. This project uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation to provide evidence on the relationship between household composition and unemployment across working ages focusing on differences in behavior by educational attainment. Using the SIPP panels, I find that individuals who become unemployed are twice as likely to move in with other people. Moving into shared living arrangements in response to unemployment is not evenly spread across the distribution of educational attainment; it is most prevalent among individuals with the less than a high school degree and those with at least some college.

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  • Emily E. Wiemers, 2014. "The Effect of Unemployment on Household Composition and Doubling Up," Working Papers 2014_05, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:mab:wpaper:2014_05
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    Cited by:

    1. Kseniya Abanokova & Michael Lokshin, 2015. "Changes in household composition as a shock-mitigating strategy," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 371-388, April.
    2. Michelle Maroto & Laura Aylsworth, 2017. "Assessing the Relationship Between Gender, Household Structure, and Net Worth in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 556-571, December.
    3. Guarin, Angela & Costanzo, Molly, 2020. "Noncustodial fathers’ financial contributions to children in three-generation households," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 119(C).
    4. Karen Glaser & Rachel Stuchbury & Debora Price & Giorgio Gessa & Eloi Ribe & Anthea Tinker, 2018. "Trends in the prevalence of grandparents living with grandchild(ren) in selected European countries and the United States," European Journal of Ageing, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 237-250, September.
    5. Julie Zissimopoulos & Johanna Thunell & Stipica Mudrazija, 2020. "Parental Income and Wealth Loss and Transfers to Their Young Adult Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 316-331, June.
    6. Gatskova, Kseniia & Kozlov, Vladimir, 2018. "Doubling Up or Moving Out? The Effect of International Labor Migration on Household Size," CEI Working Paper Series 2017-6, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    7. Tosi, Marco & Grundy, Emily, 2018. "Returns home by children and changes in parents’ well-being in Europe," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 200(C), pages 99-106.
    8. Lusi Liao & Sasiwimon Warunsiri Paweenawat, 2019. "Alternative Boomerang Kids, Intergenerational Co-residence, and Maternal Labor Supply," PIER Discussion Papers 108, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised May 2019.
    9. Sarah R. Brauner-Otto & Claudia Geist, 2018. "Uncertainty, Doubts, and Delays: Economic Circumstances and Childbearing Expectations Among Emerging Adults," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 88-102, March.
    10. Michelle Maroto, 2019. "Sharing or Limiting the Wealth? Coresidence, Parental Support, and Wealth Outcomes in Canada," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 102-116, March.
    11. Aranda, Luis, 2015. "Doubling up: A gift or a shame? Intergenerational households and parental depression of older Europeans," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 12-22.
    12. Hope Harvey, 2020. "Cumulative Effects of Doubling Up in Childhood on Young Adult Outcomes," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(2), pages 501-528, April.

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