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Nonstandard Work and Child Care Choices of Married Mothers

Author

Listed:
  • Jean Kimmel

    () (Western Michigan University)

  • Lisa Powell

    (Queen's University and University of Illinois-Chicago)

Abstract

The focus of this paper is to examine the interplay between nonstandard employment and child care choice decisions of married mothers with young children. We draw on the 1992/93 Survey of Income and Program Participation to estimate two related econometric models of child care choice that include the choice among center, sitter, relative and parental care. First, controlling for the potential endogeneity of the nonstandard work decision, we find that being a nonstandard worker significantly reduces the likelihood of using formal modes of child care such as center and sitter care. In our second model, where we jointly estimate the work status and child care choice decisions of mothers, we find that the standard versus nonstandard work decision is more responsive to the price of child care. Finally, we conclude the paper by discussing potential policy solutions to improve the child care options for mothers with young children working in nonstandard jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean Kimmel & Lisa Powell, 2001. "Nonstandard Work and Child Care Choices of Married Mothers," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 01-74, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:01-74
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rachel Connelly & Jean Kimmel, 2003. "Marital status and full-time/part-time work status in child care choices," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(7), pages 761-777.
    2. Sandra L. Hofferth & Douglas A. Wissoker, 1992. "Price, Quality, and Income in Child Care Choice," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(1), pages 70-111.
    3. David M. Blau & Alison P. Hagy, 1998. "The Demand for Quality in Child Care," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(1), pages 104-146, February.
    4. Matthew D. Shapiro, 1996. "Macroeconomic Implications of Variation in the Workweek of Capital," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 79-134.
    5. Lehrer, Evelyn L, 1989. "Preschoolers with Working Mothers: An Analysis of the Determinants of Child Care Arrangements," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 251-268.
    6. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-512, March.
    7. Robins, Philip K & Spiegelman, Robert G, 1978. "An Econometric Model of the Demand for Child Care," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(1), pages 83-94, January.
    8. Charles Michalopoulos & Philip K. Robins, 2000. "Employment and child-care choices in Canada and the United States," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 435-470, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Choi, Eun-Young & Johnson, Thomas G. & Lake, Amy & Robinson, Dennis P., 2009. "A Spatial Analysis of the Former Childcare Sector in Kansas," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 39(1).
    2. Paula Albuquerque & José Passos, 2010. "Grandparents and women's participation in the labor market," Working Papers Department of Economics 2010/16, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    3. Erdal Tekin, 2004. "Single Mothers Working at Night: Standard Work, Child Care Subsidies, and Implications for Welfare Reform," NBER Working Papers 10274, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Rachel Connelly & Jean Kimmel, 2009. "Spousal influences on parents’ non-market time choices," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 361-394, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child care; part-time; temporary; mothers; Kimmel; Powell;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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