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Quality of Teaching and Learning in Science

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Quality teaching and learning is linked to the structural and process characteristics of educational systems. Importantly, the role of education policies, of schools and of teachers in promoting high student performance is increasingly recognized (IEA, 2016; Hanushek & Woessmann, 2014). International large-scale surveys (ILSA) such as PISA allow for envisioning what is amenable to change beyond what is determined by culture and to consider reforms that improve learning conditions (Hanushek & Woessmann, 2014). This report focuses on identifying the variation in different teaching practices in the Science classroom and their relation with students’ achievement. Using PISA 2015 data collected in the student and school questionnaires, the report offers an overview of the variations in teaching practices across European Member States (EU MS) and how they relate to students’ Science achievement. For this purpose, we present univariate statistics and we explore the proportion of variance in students’ achievement that can be explained by the use of different teaching practices. More specifically, this report answers the following research question: What is the relationship between teaching practices, the learning environment and students’ achievement in EU MS? A multilevel analysis is used for the available PISA 2015 data including different levels of analysis. These analyses contribute to our understanding of the differences and similarities among countries and provide evidence regarding teaching effectiveness, giving an overview about what works well in the Science classroom in EU MS. This information strengthens the evidence-base and can be used at the EU level to share knowledge about good practices and to inform policy initiatives that focus on high quality teaching (European Commission, 2016). Specific actions in this area are intended to help raise the skills’ levels of pupils and the workforce by improving the effectiveness of education and training systems (European Commission, 2015).

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  • Patricia Costa & Luisa Araujo, "undated". "Quality of Teaching and Learning in Science," JRC Working Papers JRC109064, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  • Handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc109064
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    File URL: https://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC109064
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    1. Schwerdt, Guido & Wuppermann, Amelie C., 2011. "Is traditional teaching really all that bad? A within-student between-subject approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 365-379, April.
    2. Oliver Falck & Constantin Mang & Ludger Woessmann, 2018. "Virtually No Effect? Different Uses of Classroom Computers and their Effect on Student Achievement," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 80(1), pages 1-38, February.
    3. Ralph Hippe & Luisa De Sousa Lobo Borges de Araujo & Patricia Dinis Mota da Costa, 2016. "Equity in Education in Europe," JRC Working Papers JRC104595, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    4. Hanushek, Eric A., 2011. "The economic value of higher teacher quality," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 466-479, June.
    5. Eric A. Hanushek & Margaret E. Raymond, 2006. "School accountability and student performance," Regional Economic Development, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 51-61.
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    Keywords

    Teaching; Learning; Science; PISA;
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