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Partial Stochastic Dominance


  • Takashi Kamihigashi
  • John Stachurski


The stochastic dominance ordering over probability distributions is one of the most familiar concepts in economic and financial analysis. One difficulty with stochastic dominance is that many distributions are not ranked at all, even when arbitrarily close to other distributions that are. Because of this, several measures of ”partial” or ”near” stochastic dominance have been introduced into the literature—albeit on a somewhat ad hoc basis. This paper argues that there is a single measure of extent of stochastic dominance that can be regarded as the most natural default measure from the perspective of economic analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Takashi Kamihigashi & John Stachurski, 2014. "Partial Stochastic Dominance," Working Papers 2014-403, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipg:wpaper:2014-403

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    More about this item


    Stochastic dominance; stochastic order;

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

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