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Economic insecurity and variations in resources

Author

Listed:
  • Walter Bossert

    () (University of Montreal, Canada)

  • Conchita D'Ambrosio

    () (INSIDE, University of Luxembourg)

Abstract

Economic insecurity is a term used to describe the uncertainty surrounding economic aspects of people’s lives. Clearly, this is a multi-faceted issue and a comprehensive formal definition that subsumes all possible aspects of it is likely to remain difficult to be agreed upon for some time to come. We characterize a class of individual economic insecurity measures based on variations in economic resources. The measures involve three easily interpretable parameters and can be computed using currently available household longitudinal data. Our proposal provides a simple and intuitively appealing criterion to assist policy makers in assessing and ameliorating economic insecurity.

Suggested Citation

  • Walter Bossert & Conchita D'Ambrosio, 2016. "Economic insecurity and variations in resources," Working Papers 422, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2016-422
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    File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2016-422.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hacker, Jacob S., 2008. "The Great Risk Shift: The New Economic Insecurity and the Decline of the American Dream," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195335347.
    2. Rohde, Nicholas & Tang, K.K. & Osberg, Lars & Rao, Prasada, 2016. "The effect of economic insecurity on mental health: Recent evidence from Australian panel data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 250-258.
    3. Nicholas Rohde & Kam Ki Tang & D.S. Prasada Rao, 2014. "Distributional Characteristics of Income Insecurity in the U.S., Germany, and Britain," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S1), pages 159-176, May.
    4. Andrew Sharpe & Lars Osberg, 2009. "New Estimates of the Index of Economic Well-being for Selected OECD Countries, 1981 - 2007," CSLS Research Reports 2009-11, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    5. Smith, Trenton G. & Stillman, Steven & Craig, Stuart, 2013. "The U.S. Obesity Epidemic:New Evidence from the Economic Security Index," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151419, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:labeco:v:51:y:2018:i:c:p:307-316 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. D'Ambrosio, Conchita & Clark, Andrew E. & Barazzetta, Marta, 2018. "Unfairness at work: Well-being and quits," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 307-316.
    3. Marina Romaguera de la Cruz, 2017. "Economic insecurity in Spain: A multidimensional analysis," Working Papers 448, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Insecurity; Resource Variations; Geometric Discounting; Economic Index Numbers.;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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