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The evolution of bidding behavior in private-values auctions and double auctions

Author

Listed:
  • Rene Saran

    (Brown University)

  • Roberto Serrano

    (Brown University and IMDEA Social Sciences)

Abstract

We apply stochastic stability to study the evolution of bidding behavior in private-values second-price, first-price and k-double auctions. The learning process has a strong component of inertia but with a small probability, the bids are modified in the direction of ex-post regrets. We identify essentially a unique bid that will be used by each type in the long run. In the second-price auction, this is the truthful bid. In the first-price auction, bidding half of one’s valuation is stable. The stable bid in the k-double auction is a toughening of the Chatterjee-Samuelson linear equilibrium strategy. If we add a friction in changing one’s bid, then truth-telling behavior is also obtained in the first-price and k-double auctions. Intuitively, the stochastically stable bid minimizes the maximal regret.

Suggested Citation

  • Rene Saran & Roberto Serrano, 2007. "The evolution of bidding behavior in private-values auctions and double auctions," Working Papers 2007-10, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
  • Handle: RePEc:imd:wpaper:wp2007-10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yusuke Kamishiro & Roberto Serrano, 2009. "Equilibrium Blocking in Large Quasilinear Economies," Working Papers wp2009_0911, CEMFI.
    2. Rafael Repullo & Javier Suarez, 2008. "The Procyclical Effects of Basel II," Working Papers wp2008_0809, CEMFI.
    3. Roberto Serrano, 2009. "On Watson's Non-Forcing Contracts and Renegotiation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(3), pages 2350-2360.
    4. Manuel Arellano & Lars Peter Hansen & Enrique Sentana, 2009. "Underidentification? (Resumen)," Working Papers wp2009_0905, CEMFI.
    5. Saran, R.R.S. & Serrano, R., 2010. "Ex-Post regret learning in games with fixed and random matching: the case of private values," Research Memorandum 032, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    6. Joan Llull, 2008. "The Impact of Immigration on Productivity," Working Papers wp2008_0802, CEMFI.
    7. Serrano, Roberto & Vohra, Rajiv, 2010. "Multiplicity of mixed equilibria in mechanisms: A unified approach to exact and approximate implementation," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(5), pages 775-785, September.
    8. Max Bruche, 2009. "Bankruptcy Codes, Liquidation Timing, and Debt Valuation," Working Papers wp2009_0902, CEMFI.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    stochastic stability; ex-post regret; second-price auction; first-price auction; k-double auction;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • D44 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Auctions
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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