IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iie/wpaper/wp15-2.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Myanmar: Cross-Cutting Governance Challenges

Author

Listed:
  • Cullen S. Hendrix

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Marcus Noland

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

Abstract

Since 2010, Myanmar has been in the midst of a multifaceted transition, involving economic reforms, the resolution of multiple long-standing civil conflicts, and a nascent transition to democratic rule. These transitions are coinciding with a resource-led economic boom. Hendrix and Noland assess the current status of governance institutions, as well as their performance in comparison to member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and selected other countries. They discuss outstanding problem areas related to economic governance, particularly in the legal system, the business regulatory framework, and in bureaucratic capacity, as well as the potential use of external policy anchors, particularly in the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative process, to strengthen Myanmar's ongoing reform effort.

Suggested Citation

  • Cullen S. Hendrix & Marcus Noland, 2015. "Myanmar: Cross-Cutting Governance Challenges," Working Paper Series WP15-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp15-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://piie.com/publications/working-papers/myanmar-cross-cutting-governance-challenges
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brancati, Dawn, 2006. "Decentralization: Fueling the Fire or Dampening the Flames of Ethnic Conflict and Secessionism?," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(03), pages 651-685, July.
    2. Lotta Themnér & Peter Wallensteen, 2013. "Armed Conflicts, 1946–2012," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 50(4), pages 509-521, July.
    3. Koji Kubo, 2013. "Myanmar's two decades of partial transition to a market economy: a negative legacy for the new government," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 357-370, September.
    4. Valerie Cerra & Sweta Chaman Saxena, 2008. "Growth Dynamics: The Myth of Economic Recovery," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(1), pages 439-457, March.
    5. Gary S. Becker & George J. Stigler, 1974. "Law Enforcement, Malfeasance, and Compensation of Enforcers," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-18, January.
    6. Fumiharu Mieno, 2013. "Toward Myanmar's New Stage of Development: Transition from Military Rule to the Market," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 8(1), pages 94-117, June.
    7. Givens, David, 2013. "Defining governance matters: A factor analytic assessment of governance institutions," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 1026-1053.
    8. Van Rijckeghem, Caroline & Weder, Beatrice, 2001. "Bureaucratic corruption and the rate of temptation: do wages in the civil service affect corruption, and by how much?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 307-331, August.
    9. Cullen S. Hendrix & Marcus Noland, 2014. "Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 6765.
    10. Sean TURNELL, 2011. "Fundamentals of Myanmar's Macroeconomy: A Political Economy Perspective," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 6(1), pages 136-153, June.
    11. Besley, Timothy & McLaren, John, 1993. "Taxes and Bribery: The Role of Wage Incentives," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(416), pages 119-141, January.
    12. Susan Ariel Aaronson & Jennifer Brinkerhoff, 2009. "Limited Partnership: Business, Government, Civil Society (NGOs) and the Public in the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI)," Working Papers 2010-28, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Soans, Aaron & Abe, Masato, 2016. "Bribery, corruption and bureaucratic hassle: Evidence from Myanmar," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 41-56.
    2. Cullen S. Hendrix & Marcus Noland, 2014. "Managing Myanmar's Resource Boom to Lock in Reforms," Policy Briefs PB14-11, Peterson Institute for International Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Myanmar; governance; economic reform; resource curse;

    JEL classification:

    • N45 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Asia including Middle East
    • P28 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Natural Resources; Environment
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp15-2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peterson Institute webmaster). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iieeeus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.