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Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance


  • Cullen S. Hendrix

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Marcus Noland

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)


Countries blessed with abundant natural resources often seek financial and political power from their supposedly lucky status. But the potentially negative impact of natural resources on development of poor countries is captured in the phrase "the resource curse." Instead of success and prosperity, producers of gold, oil, rubber, sugar, and other commodities—many in the least developed parts of Africa and Asia—often remain mired in poverty and plagued by economic mismanagement, political authoritarianism, foreign exploitation, and violent conflict. These difficulties and the many challenges they pose for American foreign policy are the focus of this important new book. Marcus Noland and Cullen S. Hendrix review recent developments as poor countries struggle to avoid the "resource curse" but fall too often into that trap. They call for support for international efforts to encourage greater transparency and improved management of natural resource wealth and for new partnerships between the West and the developing world to "confront the curse."

Suggested Citation

  • Cullen S. Hendrix & Marcus Noland, 2014. "Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 6765.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:6765

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2011. "From Financial Crash to Debt Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1676-1706, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Hodler, Roland & Parks, Bradley C. & Raschky, Paul A. & Tierney, Michael J., 2015. "Aid on Demand: African Leaders and the Geography of China's Foreign Assistance," CEPR Discussion Papers 10704, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Parks, Bradley & Strange, Austin M. & Tierney, Michael J., 2016. "Apples and Dragon Fruits: The Determinants of Aid and Other Forms of State Financing from China to Africa," Working Papers 0620, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    3. Aslund, Anders, 2014. "Why could growth rates decrease in emerging market economies?," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, pages 7-34.
    4. Christian von Haldenwang & Maksym Ivanyna, 2017. "Does the political resource curse affect public finance? The vulnerability of tax revenue in resource-rich countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 007, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Hendrix, Cullen & Noland, Marcus, 2015. "Myanmar: Cross-Cutting Governance Challenges," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 428, Asian Development Bank.
    6. repec:spr:weltar:v:153:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10290-017-0288-y is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Anders Aslund, 2013. "Why Growth in Emerging Economies Is Likely to Fall," Working Paper Series WP13-10, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    8. Cullen S. Hendrix, 2014. "Oil Prices and Interstate Conflict Behavior," Working Paper Series WP14-3, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    9. Cullen S. Hendrix & Marcus Noland, 2014. "Managing Myanmar's Resource Boom to Lock in Reforms," Policy Briefs PB14-11, Peterson Institute for International Economics.

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