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Famine and Reform in North Korea

  • Marcus Noland

    ()

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

North Korea has been experiencing a food emergency for more than a decade, and in the 1990s experienced a famine that may have claimed one million lives. The crisis is distinguished by its protracted nature, and while conditions have eased somewhat in recent years, the situation remains quite precarious and the country could lapse back into famine. This paper examines the origins of the food crisis, the impact of the 1990s famine, and the prospects for resolution of the North Korean emergency in light of economic reforms initiated in 2002 and the subsequent diplomatic confrontation over the country's nuclear program.

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Paper provided by Peterson Institute for International Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number WP03-5.

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Date of creation: Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp03-5
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  1. Marcus Noland & Sherman Robinson & Tao Wang, 1999. "Rigorous Speculation: The Collapse and Revival of the North Korean Economy," Working Paper Series WP99-1, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  2. Noland, Marcus & Robinson, Sherman & Wang, Tao, 2001. "Famine in North Korea: Causes and Cures," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(4), pages 741-67, July.
  3. Daniel Goodkind & Loraine West, 2001. "The North Korean Famine and Its Demographic Impact," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(2), pages 219-238.
  4. Marcus Noland, 2000. "Avoiding the Apocalypse: The Future of the Two Koreas," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 94.
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