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Doubly Robust Estimation of Causal Effects with Multivalued Treatments

Author

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  • Uysal, S. Derya

    (Department of Economics and Finance, Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna, Austria)

Abstract

This paper provides doubly robust estimators for treatment effect parameters which are defined in multivalued treatment effect framework. We apply this method on a unique data set of British Cohort Study (BCS) to estimate returns to different levels of schooling. Average returns are estimated for entire population, as well as conditional on having a specific educational achievement. The analysis is carried out for female and male samples separately to capture possible gender differences. The results indicate that, on average, the percentage wage gain due to higher education versus any other lower educational attainment is higher for highly educated females than highly educated males.

Suggested Citation

  • Uysal, S. Derya, 2013. "Doubly Robust Estimation of Causal Effects with Multivalued Treatments," Economics Series 297, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:297
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    File URL: http://www.ihs.ac.at/publications/eco/es-297.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Lechner, 2002. "Program Heterogeneity And Propensity Score Matching: An Application To The Evaluation Of Active Labor Market Policies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 205-220, May.
    2. Flossmann Anton L. & Pohlmeier Winfried, 2006. "Causal Returns to Education: A Survey on Empirical Evidence for Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 226(1), pages 6-23, February.
    3. Markus Fr–lich, 2004. "Programme Evaluation with Multiple Treatments," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(2), pages 181-224, April.
    4. Cattaneo, Matias D., 2010. "Efficient semiparametric estimation of multi-valued treatment effects under ignorability," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 155(2), pages 138-154, April.
    5. James J. Heckman & Xuesong Li, 2004. "Selection bias, comparative advantage and heterogeneous returns to education: evidence from China in 2000," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 155-171, October.
    6. Jo Blanden & Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan, 2007. "Accounting for Intergenerational Income Persistence: Noncognitive Skills, Ability and Education," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(519), pages 43-60, March.
    7. James J. Heckman & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2007. "Econometric Evaluation of Social Programs, Part I: Causal Models, Structural Models and Econometric Policy Evaluation," Handbook of Econometrics,in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 70 Elsevier.
    8. Tan, Zhiqiang, 2006. "Regression and Weighting Methods for Causal Inference Using Instrumental Variables," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 101, pages 1607-1618, December.
    9. Uysal, Selver Derya & Pohlmeier, Winfried, 2011. "Unemployment duration and personality," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 980-992.
    10. Tan, Zhiqiang, 2006. "A Distributional Approach for Causal Inference Using Propensity Scores," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 101, pages 1619-1637, December.
    11. Heineck, Guido & Anger, Silke, 2010. "The returns to cognitive abilities and personality traits in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 535-546, June.
    12. Card, David, 2001. "Estimating the Return to Schooling: Progress on Some Persistent Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(5), pages 1127-1160, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sloczynski, Tymon & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2014. "A General Double Robustness Result for Estimating Average Treatment Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 8084, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Sokbae Lee & Ryo Okui & Yoon-Jae Whang, 2016. "Doubly robust uniform confidence band for the conditional average treatment effect function," CeMMAP working papers CWP03/16, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Dimitrios Rovithis, 2013. "Do health economic evaluations using observational data provide reliable assessment of treatment effects?," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 1-7, December.
    4. Dabalen, Andrew L. & Paul, Saumik, 2014. "Effect of Conflict on Dietary Diversity: Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 143-158.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Multivalued treatment; returns to schooling; doubly robust estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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