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Is there real freedom of school choice? An analysis from Chile

Author

Listed:
  • Mauro Mediavilla

    () (University of Valencia & IEB)

  • Adrián Zancajo

    () (Autonomous University of Barcelona & GEPS)

Abstract

Between 1981 and 1990, Chile began to implement an education reform based on school choice and a financing system through vouchers. In theory, the system ensures complete freedom of choice of school by families. This paper attempts to identify the existence of factors that conditioned the enrolment process in the different types of schools existing nowadays in the Chilean educational system, the largest quasi-market of Latin America. Results show a social stratification and separation by schools and indicate how geographical distance and social composition are the most critical factors for families when choosing a school.

Suggested Citation

  • Mauro Mediavilla & Adrián Zancajo, 2015. "Is there real freedom of school choice? An analysis from Chile," Working Papers 2015/36, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  • Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:doc2015-36
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark Schneider & Gregory Elacqua & Jack Buckley, 2006. "School choice in Chile: Is it class or the classroom?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 577-601.
    2. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "Does Competition among Public Schools Benefit Students and Taxpayers?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1209-1238, December.
    3. Dante Contreras & Paulina Sepúlveda & Sebastián Bustos, 2010. "When Schools Are the Ones that Choose: The Effects of Screening in Chile," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(s1), pages 1349-1368.
    4. Francisco Gallego & Andrés Hernando, 2009. "School Choice in Chile: Looking at the Demand Side," Documentos de Trabajo 356, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    5. Hastings, Justine S. & Kane, Thomas J. & Staiger, Douglas O., 2005. "Parental Preferences and School Competition: Evidence from a Public School Choice Program," Working Papers 10, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    6. Paredes, Ricardo & Ugarte, Gabriel, 2009. "Should Students Be Allowed to Miss?," MPRA Paper 15583, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Justine S. Hastings & Jeffrey M. Weinstein, 2007. "Information, School Choice, and Academic Achievement: Evidence from Two Experiments," NBER Working Papers 13623, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Chumacero, Rómulo A. & Gómez, Daniel & Paredes, Ricardo D., 2011. "I would walk 500 miles (if it paid): Vouchers and school choice in Chile," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1103-1114, October.
    9. Gregory Elacqua & Mat’as Martinez & Humberto Santos & Daniela Urbina, 2012. "School closures in Chile: Access to quality alternatives in a school choice system," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 39(2 Year 20), pages 179-202, December.
    10. Hsieh, Chang-Tai & Urquiola, Miguel, 2006. "The effects of generalized school choice on achievement and stratification: Evidence from Chile's voucher program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(8-9), pages 1477-1503, September.
    11. J. Scott Long & Jeremy Freese, 2006. "Regression Models for Categorical Dependent Variables using Stata, 2nd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 2, number long2, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    School choice; social class; quasi-markets; voucher; Chile;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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