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Enforcement, Regulation and Development

  • Laffont, Jean-Jacques

After discussing examples of enforcement failures for regulatory contracts in Africa, we develop a regulation model with asymmetric information and imperfect enforcement. Either the regulator succeeds in forcing the regulated firm to fulfill the contract or renegotiation takes place. The probability of renegotiation decreases with the level of enforcement expenditures which is chosen by the regulator. The model suggests that the endogenous level of enforcement decreases with the proneness to corruption, and increases and then decreases with the level of development. Finally, we document this relationship empirically. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Paper provided by Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse in its series IDEI Working Papers with number 129.

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Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of African Economies, vol.�12, octobre 2003, p.�193-211.
Handle: RePEc:ide:wpaper:664
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  1. Janusz A. Ordover & Russell W. Pittman & Paul Clyde, 1994. "Competition policy for natural monopolies in a developing market economy 1," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 2(3), pages 317-343, 09.
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  7. Border, Kim C & Sobel, Joel, 1987. "Samurai Accountant: A Theory of Auditing and Plunder," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 525-40, October.
  8. Mookherjee, Dilip & Png, Ivan, 1989. "Optimal Auditing, Insurance, and Redistribution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 104(2), pages 399-415, May.
  9. Dominik H. Enste & Friedrich Schneider, 2000. "Shadow Economies: Size, Causes, and Consequences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(1), pages 77-114, March.
  10. Jean-Jacques Laffont & Jean Tirole, 1993. "A Theory of Incentives in Procurement and Regulation," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262121743, June.
  11. Gale, Douglas & Hellwig, Martin, 1985. "Incentive-Compatible Debt Contracts: The One-Period Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 647-63, October.
  12. Khalil, F., 1992. "Auditing Without Commitment," Working Papers 92-15, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  13. Cremer, H. & Marchand, M. & Pestieau, P., 1988. "Evading, auditing and taxing: the equity-compliance tradeoff," CORE Discussion Papers 1988027, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  14. David P. Baron & David Besanko, 1984. "Regulation, Asymmetric Information, and Auditing," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 15(4), pages 447-470, Winter.
  15. Khalil, F., 1992. "Auditing Without Commitment," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 92-15, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
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