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Políticas de orientación interna, instituciones, autócratas y crecimiento económico en América Latina: un análisis empírico

  • Alberto Chong

    ()

  • Luisa Zanforlin

(Disponible en idioma inglés únicamente) En este trabajo se analizan los factores institucionales determinantes del crecimiento económico en América Latina, aprovechando para ello investigaciones empíricas recientes que emplean mediciones subjetivas y objetivas para poner a prueba una posible explicación al estilo Northque vincula la calidad institucional con el crecimiento económico. Se presenta un marco que contribuye a entender mejor las opciones de los diseñadores de políticas y la persistencia en cuanto a las políticas de orientación interna que se aplicaron entre los años 30 y 80, sosteniendo que en el caso de América Latina, la idea de Olson (1982) de abarcar el interés se debe ampliar para cubrir no sólo el interés económico de quienes detentan poder, sino también su interés político, más o menos siguiendo la dirección de la obra de Robinson (1997).

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4256.

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Date of creation: Apr 2001
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4256
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