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Evolución de la concentración urbana en todo el mundo: un enfoque de panel

  • Alejandro Gaviria
  • Ernesto H. Stein

(Disponible en idioma inglés únicamente) En este trabajo empleamos un enfoque de panel para estudiar el crecimiento de la población en las principales ciudades del mundo. Hallamos que las principales ciudades crecen con mayor rapidez en economías relativamente atrasadas y en economías más inestables y de crecimiento más rápido. También hallamos que los efectos de las políticas del comercio sobre el crecimiento de ciudades importantes depende considerablemente de la geografía. Mientras que el crecimiento demográfico en importantes ciudades ubicadas en puertos o cerca de ellos no cambia tras un repunte de los flujos de comercio, el crecimiento demográfico en ciudades importantes tierra adentro sí tiende a desacelerarse luego del mismo hecho. Por otro lado, no hallamos efecto alguno del régimen político sobre el crecimiento demográfico de ciudades importantes. Por último, hallamos algunos elementos de prueba de que, si todo lo demás se mantiene igual, las ciudades de mayor tamaño tienden a crecer a un menor ritmo.

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4198.

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Date of creation: Apr 2000
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4198
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