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Trade Policy Reform as Institutional Reform

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  • Dani Rodrik

Abstract

Economists are trained to think about trade policy reform in terms of changes in the levels of tariffs and quantitative restrictions and the shifts in relative prices brought about by these alterations.

Suggested Citation

  • Dani Rodrik, 2000. "Trade Policy Reform as Institutional Reform," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2189, Inter-American Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:brikps:2189
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Zoido-Lobaton, Pablo, 1999. "Governance matters," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2196, The World Bank.
    2. Katharina PISTOR, 2000. "The Standardization Of Law And Its Effect On Developing Economies," G-24 Discussion Papers 4, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    3. Yifu Lin, Justin & Nugent, Jeffrey B., 1995. "Institutions and economic development," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 38, pages 2301-2370 Elsevier.
    4. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 997-1032, October.
    5. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
    6. Edwards, Sebastian, 1998. "Openness, Productivity and Growth: What Do We Really Know?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 383-398, March.
    7. North, Douglass C. & Weingast, Barry R., 1989. "Constitutions and Commitment: The Evolution of Institutions Governing Public Choice in Seventeenth-Century England," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(04), pages 803-832, December.
    8. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    9. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    10. Finger, Michael J. & Schuler, Philip, 1999. "Implementation of Ururguay Round commitments : the development challenge," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2215, The World Bank.
    11. Dan Ben-David, 1993. "Equalizing Exchange: Trade Liberalization and Income Convergence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 653-679.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. François Bourguignon & Thierry Verdier, 2005. "The Political Economy of Education and Development in an Open Economy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(3), pages 529-548, August.
    2. Costantini, Valeria & Monni, Salvatore, 2008. "Environment, human development and economic growth," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(4), pages 867-880, February.
    3. repec:qba:annpro:v:13:y:2003:id:518 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Chahir Zaki & Fida Karam, 2017. "Why Don’t MENA Countries Trade More? The Curse of Bad Institutions," Working Papers 1148, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 2003.
    5. Kaliappa Kalirajan, 2008. "Gravity model specification and estimation: revisited," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(13), pages 1037-1039.

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