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How do Unusual Working Schedules Affect Social Life?

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  • Juliane Scheffel

Abstract

The widening of the working hour distribution complicates the coordination of social leisure. This paper examines the short- and long-run impact of unusual working schedules on social life using German Time Use Data for 2001/02. I find evidence that younger workers with higher than median earnings seem to accept higher levels of solitary leisure as investment and because of the substantial wage premia. Younger workers tend to substitute sleep with free time. Older workers, in contrast, tend to sleep less which can be interpreted as elevated risk of mental and physical health.

Suggested Citation

  • Juliane Scheffel, 2011. "How do Unusual Working Schedules Affect Social Life?," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2011-025, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:hum:wpaper:sfb649dp2011-025
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    File URL: http://sfb649.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/papers/pdf/SFB649DP2011-025.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2004. "Well-being over time in Britain and the USA," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1359-1386, July.
    2. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Osberg, Lars, 2003. "Nobody to play with? The implications of leisure coordination," ISER Working Paper Series 2003-19, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Juliane Scheffel, 2011. "Compensation of Unusual Working Schedules," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2011-026, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    4. Lanfranchi, Joseph & Ohlsson, Henry & Skalli, Ali, 2002. "Compensating wage differentials and shift work preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 393-398, February.
    5. Lanfranchi, Joseph & Ohlsson, Henry & Skalli, Ali, 2002. "Compensating wage differentials and shift work preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 393-398, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    ShiftWork; Non-StandardWorking Hours; Time Allocation; Social Capital; Social Life; Solitary Leisure; Adverse Consequences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities

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