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Labor Policy and Investment

  • John Budd

    ()

  • Yijiang Wang

    ()

Policy debates over proposed legislative labor policy changes include contentions that business investment will negatively respond to labor laws that favor labor. Research on labor policy, however, often assumes that investment is fixed. We present a sequential bargaining model in which labor policies that increase labor's bargaining power and reduce management's options during strikes are predicted to reduce investment. Using provincial data on investment for 1967 to 1999, a strike replacement ban and protections for workers who refuse to handle struck work are estimated to reduce new investment, especially within the first few years after the policy change.

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Paper provided by Human Resources and Labor Studies, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities Campus) in its series Working Papers with number 0502.

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Handle: RePEc:hrr:papers:0502
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  1. Budd, John W., 2000. "The effect of strike replacement legislation on employment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 225-247, March.
  2. Baldwin, Carliss Y, 1983. "Productivity and Labor Unions: An Application of the Theory of Self-Enforcing Contracts," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56(2), pages 155-85, April.
  3. Peter Cramton & Morley Gunderson & Joseph Tracy, 1999. "The Effect of Collective Bargaining Legislation on Strikes and Wages," Papers of Peter Cramton 99res, University of Maryland, Department of Economics - Peter Cramton, revised 30 Jul 1998.
  4. Kevin Denny & Stephen Nickell, 1991. "Unions and Investment in British Manufacturing Industry," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 113-121, 03.
  5. Denny, K. & Nickell, S., 1990. "Unions And Investment In British Industry," Economics Series Working Papers 9992, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. Bruce C. Fallick & Kevin A. Hassett, 1996. "Investment and union certification," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 96-43, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  7. Budd, J.W., 1993. "Canadian Strike Replacement Legislation and Collective Bargainig : Lessons for United States," Papers 93-08, Minnesota - Industrial Relations Center.
  8. Morley Gunderson & John Kervin & Frank Reid, 1989. "The Effect of Labour Relations Legislation on Strike Incidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 22(4), pages 779-94, November.
  9. Gunderson, Morley & Melino, Angelo, 1990. "The Effects of Public Policy on Strike Duration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(3), pages 295-316, July.
  10. Henry C. Simons, 1944. "Some Reflections on Syndicalism," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52, pages 1.
  11. Cameron W. Odgers & Julian R. Betts, 1997. "Do Unions Reduce Investment? Evidence from Canada," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(1), pages 18-36, October.
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