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Impacts of Institutional Changes in Cambodia under the Pol Pot Regime

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  • Kogure, Katsuo

Abstract

This paper presents an econometric analysis of impacts of the communist revolution by the Khmer Rouge (1975-’79) in Cambodia on economic behaviors of survivors after 1979. Specifically, we compare forced marriages in the Pol Pot regime with regular marriages after its collapse, and make econometric evaluations of their educational investments for children. Our econometric results are interpreted as meaning that forced-marriage couples invested less in their children’s education than the regular-marriage couples. We consider those results, by reflecting upon social and political structures of Cambodia under and after the Pol Pot regime.

Suggested Citation

  • Kogure, Katsuo, 2013. "Impacts of Institutional Changes in Cambodia under the Pol Pot Regime," CEI Working Paper Series 2012-13, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:hitcei:2012-13
    Note: March 2013
    as

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/hermes/ir/re/28430/wp2012-13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Kogure, Katsuo & Takasaki, Yoshito, 2015. "Conflict, Institutions, and Economic Behavior: Legacies of the Cambodian Genocide," CEI Working Paper Series 2014-13, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    educational investments for children; family organizations; institutions; norms; political economy; violence;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • N35 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • P26 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Political Economy

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