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The Determinants and Effects of Early Job Separation in Japan

  • Fujii, Mayu
  • Shiraishi, Kousuke
  • Takayama, Noriyuki
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    Using the panel data from the 2011 Japanese Longitudinal Survey on Employment and Fertility (LOSEF), this study aims to investigate (i) the determinants of early job separation of male workers who started their working career as regular employees, and (ii) the effects of early job separation on later labor market outcomes. In conducting this investigation, we take into account the possibility that (i) and (ii) may vary by cohort, reflecting the considerable changes in Japan’s industrial structure and labor market since the early 1990s. The results of the investigation can be summarized as follows. First, the percentage of individuals leaving the first job within the first five years is significantly higher for individuals in younger cohorts. Second, in line with previous studies, we find that the duration of the first job is significantly related with macroeconomic conditions at the time of searching for the first job. We also find that for the younger cohort the duration of the first job is related with individuals’non-cognitive skills (e.g., communication skills). Finally, individuals leaving their first job within the first few years are likely to be enrolled in the employees’pension insurance system for fewer years and more likely to change their job in the future. Furthermore, individuals who leave the first job very early - within one or two years - tend to change their job more frequently than others.

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/25515/1/DP590.pdf
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    Paper provided by Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series CIS Discussion paper series with number 590.

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    Length: [35] p.
    Date of creation: Mar 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hit:cisdps:590
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    9. Takayama, Noriyuki & Inagaki, Seiichi & Oshio, Takashi, 2012. "The Japanese Longitudinal Survey on Employment and Fertility (LOSEF): Essential Features of the 2011 Internet Version and a Guide to Its Users," CIS Discussion paper series 546, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
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    11. Masanori Hashimoto & Yoshio Higuchi, 2005. "Issues Facing the Japanese Labor Market," Working Papers 05-01, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
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    17. Kenn Ariga & Masako Kurosawa & Fumio Ohtake & Masaru Sasaki, 2012. "How Do High School Graduates In Japan Compete For Regular, Full-Time Jobs? An Empirical Analysis Based Upon An Internet Survey Of The Youth," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 348-379, 09.
    18. Richard Freeman & David G. Blanchflower, 2000. "Introduction to "Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries"," NBER Chapters, in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 1-16 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    20. Philip Oreopoulos & Till von Wachter & Andrew Heisz, 2012. "The Short- and Long-Term Career Effects of Graduating in a Recession," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 1-29, January.
    21. David G. Blanchflower & Richard B. Freeman, 2000. "Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number blan00-1, August.
    22. Gartell, Marie, 2009. "Unemployment and subsequent earnings for Swedish college graduates. A study of scarring effects," Arbetsrapport 2009:2, Institute for Futures Studies.
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