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How do high school graduates in Japan compete for regular, full time jobs? An empirical analysis based upon an internet survey of the youth

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Listed:
  • Kenn Ariga

    (Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University)

  • Masako Kurosawa

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

  • Fumio Ohtake

    (Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University)

  • Masaru Sasaki

    (Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University)

Abstract

We use a survey of the Japanese youth within 10 year after high school graduation to investiage the impacts of the academic and social skills on their success in the job market. We find three major factors account for the job market outcome immediately after school: school characteristics and job placement services, academic performance, and social skills, including the negative impacts of problematic behaviors at the school. Second, when we run a Probit regression on whether or not the surveyed individuals hold regular, full time job, we find the persistent but declining (over age) im- pact of the job placement immediately after school. Moreover, we find the impact of variables pertaining to the sociall skills remain significant even after controling for the job placement outcome after school, whereas other variables such as GPA or attributes of highschools are largely irrelevant to the current employment status.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenn Ariga & Masako Kurosawa & Fumio Ohtake & Masaru Sasaki, 2009. "How do high school graduates in Japan compete for regular, full time jobs? An empirical analysis based upon an internet survey of the youth," KIER Working Papers 678, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:678
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kondo, Ayako, 2007. "Does the first job really matter? State dependency in employment status in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 379-402, September.
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    3. Esteban-Pretel, Julen & Nakajima, Ryo & Tanaka, Ryuichi, 2011. "Are contingent jobs dead ends or stepping stones to regular jobs? Evidence from a structural estimation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 513-526, August.
    4. Yuji Genda & Ayako Kondo & Souichi Ohta, 2010. "Long-Term Effects of a Recession at Labor Market Entry in Japan and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(1).
    5. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. David Roodman, 2009. "Estimating Fully Observed Recursive Mixed-Process Models with cmp," Working Papers 168, Center for Global Development.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ariga, Kenn & Ohtake, Fumio & Sasaki, Masaru & Wu, Zheren, 2012. "Wage Growth through Job Hopping in China," IZA Discussion Papers 7104, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Fujii, Mayu & Shiraishi, Kousuke & Takayama, Noriyuki, 2013. "The Determinants and Effects of Early Job Separation in Japan," CIS Discussion paper series 590, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Jess Diamond, 2018. "Employment Status Persistence in the Japanese Labour Market," The Japanese Economic Review, Springer, vol. 69(1), pages 69-100, March.
    4. Morita, Tamaki & Yamamoto, Kimika & Managi, Shunsuke, 2018. "The relationship between school-based career education and subsequent incomes: Empirical evidence from Japan," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 70-87.
    5. Fujii, Mayu & Shiraishi, Kousuke & Takayama, Noriyuki, 2018. "The effects of early job separation on later life outcomes," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 68-84.

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