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Who Creates Jobs and Who Creates Productivity? Small versus Large versus Young versus Old

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Abstract

This paper examines employment and productivity dynamics in the Swedish business sector during the period 1996–2013. In order to analyze employment and productivity in a consistent way we apply a novel implementation of a method, which previously has been used extensively to analyze job dynamics, on both job and productivity dynamics. Our results, based on detailed matched employer-employee data for Sweden, indicate substantial heterogeneity in terms of job and productivity dynamics for different types of firms. We find that most of the net jobs were created in young, small firms, but at the same time we also find that most of the productivity gains were created in large old incumbent firms, thus suggesting a division of labor between the two. Our analysis provides new insights into the importance of age and size of firms in the restructuring process, stressing the dichotomy between employment growth and productivity growth in different types of firms.

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  • Heyman, Fredrik & Norbäck, Pehr-Johan & Persson, Lars, 2017. "Who Creates Jobs and Who Creates Productivity? Small versus Large versus Young versus Old," Working Paper Series 1189, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:1189
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    1. Davidson, Carl & Heyman, Fredrik & Matusz, Steven & Sjöholm, Fredrik & Zhu, Susan Chun, 2014. "Globalization and imperfect labor market sorting," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 177-194.
    2. John Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Robert Kulick & Javier Miranda, 2016. "High Growth Young Firms: Contribution to Job, Output, and Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Measuring Entrepreneurial Businesses: Current Knowledge and Challenges, pages 11-62 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Michael Anyadike-Danes & Carl-Magnus Bjuggren & Sandra Gottschalk & Werner Hölzl & Dan Johansson & Mika Maliranta & Anja Myrann, 2015. "An international cohort comparison of size effects on job growth," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 44(4), pages 821-844, April.
    4. Chad Syverson, 2011. "What Determines Productivity?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(2), pages 326-365, June.
    5. Mark Doms & Eric J. Bartelsman, 2000. "Understanding Productivity: Lessons from Longitudinal Microdata," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 569-594, September.
    6. Lucia Foster & John C. Haltiwanger & C. J. Krizan, 2001. "Aggregate Productivity Growth: Lessons from Microeconomic Evidence," NBER Chapters,in: New Developments in Productivity Analysis, pages 303-372 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. David Neumark & Brandon Wall & Junfu Zhang, 2011. "Do Small Businesses Create More Jobs? New Evidence for the United States from the National Establishment Time Series," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(1), pages 16-29, August.
    8. Yongil Jeon & Stephen M. Miller, 2002. "An 'Ideal' Deconposition of Industry Dynamics: An Application to the Nationwide and State Level U.S. Banking Industry," Working papers 2002-23, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    9. Nilsson Hakkala, Katariina & Heyman, Fredrik & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2008. "Multinational Firms and Job Tasks," Working Paper Series 781, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    10. Gartell, Marie & Jans, Ann-Christin & Persson, Helena, 2010. "The importance of education for the reallocation of labor: Evidence from Swedish linked employer-employee data 1986-2002," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 206-214, January.
    11. John Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2013. "Who Creates Jobs? Small versus Large versus Young," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(2), pages 347-361, May.
    12. Nilsson Hakkala, Katariina & Heyman, Fredrik & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2014. "Multinational firms, acquisitions and job tasks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 248-265.
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    1. repec:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:7:p:1809-1822 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Heyman, Fredrik & Norbäck, Pehr-Johan & Persson, Lars & Andersson, Fredrik, 2019. "Has the Swedish business sector become more entrepreneurial than the US business sector?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(7), pages 1809-1822.
    3. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-19-00167 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job dynamics; Productivity; Matched employer-employee data; Industrial structure and structural change;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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