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Costs and Benefits of Electric Vehicles - A 2010 Perspective

  • Carlsson, Fredrik

    ()

    (Department of Economics, School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University)

  • Johansson-Stenman, Olof

    (Department of Economics, School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University)

This paper undertakes a social cost-benefit analysis regarding an increase in the number of electric vehicles in the Swedish transport sector by year 2010. Battery cars are generally found to be socially unprofitable, even though their private life-cycle costs and external costs are lower than those of petrol cars. One important reason for this is that electric vehicles are heavily ‘subsidised’ by having, in comparison with taxes on fossil fuel, a very low electricity tax. ‘Hybrid’ cars are more likely to be socially profitable, especially for city-based delivery trucks, which may be both privately and socially profitable without subsidies.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/2873
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Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 73.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 07 Jun 2002
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, 2003, pages 1-28.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0073
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/

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  1. Bovenberg, A Lans & de Mooij, Ruud A, 1997. "Environmental Levies and Distortionary Taxation: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 252-53, March.
  2. DeLuchi, Mark A., 1993. "Greenhouse-gas emissions from the use of new fuels for transportation and electricity," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 187-191, May.
  3. Brownston, David & Bunch, David S. & Train, Kenneth, 1999. "Joint mixed logit models of stated and revealed preferences for alternative-fuel vehicles," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7rf7s3nx, University of California Transportation Center.
  4. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-152985 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Fredrik Carlsson & Olof Johansson-Stenman, 2003. "Costs and Benefits of Electric Vehicles," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, London School of Economics and University of Bath, vol. 37(1), pages 1-28, January.
  6. Azar, Christian & Sterner, Thomas, 1996. "Discounting and distributional considerations in the context of global warming," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 169-184, November.
  7. Atkinson, Anthony B & Stern, N H, 1974. "Pigou, Taxation and Public Goods," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(1), pages 119-28, January.
  8. Robert W. Hahn, 1995. "Choosing among fuels and technologies for cleaning up the air," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 532-554.
  9. Christiansen, Vidar, 1981. "Evaluation of Public Projects under Optimal Taxation," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 447-57, July.
  10. Brownstone, David & Train, Kenneth, 1999. "Forecasting new product penetration with flexible substitution patterns," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3tb6j874, University of California Transportation Center.
  11. Kazimi, Camilla, 1997. "Evaluating the Environmental Impact of Alternative-Fuel Vehicles," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 163-185, June.
  12. Kazimi, Camilla, 1997. "Valuing Alternative-Fuel Vehicles in Southern California," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 265-71, May.
  13. de Bovenberg, A Lans & Mooij, Ruud A, 1994. "Environmental Levies and Distortionary Taxation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1085-89, September.
  14. Boadway, Robin & Keen, Michael, 1993. "Public Goods, Self-Selection and Optimal Income Taxation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(3), pages 463-78, August.
  15. Schimek, Paul, 2001. "Reducing emissions from transit buses," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 433-451, July.
  16. Fredrik Carlsson & Olof Johansson-Stenman, 2000. "Willingness to pay for improved air quality in Sweden," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(6), pages 661-669.
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