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The Impact of Firm Collateral on Knowledge Intensive Consulting Firms


  • Martinsson, Gustav

    () (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)


This paper explores how sales and employment for knowledge intensive consulting firms are correlated. I apply theory on cash flow-investment sensitivities, mostly applied to manufacturing firms, to a less capital intensive part of the economy. Therefore the knowledge intensive consulting sector is investigated but instead of analyzing the investment in plant and machinery this analysis regards the investment in skilled employees. The argument of Kaplan & Zingales (1997) regarding low cash flow-investment sensitivity being a sign of financial distress is applied. The main result is that firms less likely to be financially constrained display 60 percent higher sales-employment sensitivities than firms more likely to be financially constrained. The results are estimated from a sample comprising 23,500 Swedish knowledge intensive consulting firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Martinsson, Gustav, 2008. "The Impact of Firm Collateral on Knowledge Intensive Consulting Firms," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 135, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0135

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Philippe Aghion & Philippe Askenazy & Nicolas Berman & Gilbert Cette & Laurent Eymard, 2012. "Credit Constraints And The Cyclicality Of R&D Investment: Evidence From France," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(5), pages 1001-1024, October.
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    7. Stephen Bond & Dietmar Harhoff & John Van Reenen, 2010. "Investment, R&D and Financial Constraints in Britain and Germany," NBER Chapters,in: Contributions in Memory of Zvi Griliches, pages 433-460 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    9. Martinsson, Gustav, 2008. "Firm Collateral and the Cyclicality of Knowledge Intensity," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 134, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    10. Stephen Bond, 2002. "Dynamic panel data models: a guide to microdata methods and practice," CeMMAP working papers CWP09/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    11. Sharpe, Steven A, 1994. "Financial Market Imperfections, Firm Leverage, and the Cyclicality of Employment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1060-1074, September.
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    13. Graham Hall & Patrick Hutchinson & Nicos Michaelas, 2000. "Industry Effects on the Determinants of Unquoted SMEs' Capital Structure," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 297-312.
    14. repec:pse:psecon:2008-26 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item


    Incomplete markets; asymmetric information; knowledge intensive business services; economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • D52 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Incomplete Markets
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • L84 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Personal, Professional, and Business Services
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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