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FDI inflows to the Transition Economies in Eastern Europe: Magnitude and Determinants

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  • Johnson, Andreas

    () (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)

Abstract

This paper shows that there are large differences in the volume of FDI that individual European transition economies have attracted and tries to find determinants that can explain this distribution of FDI, using panel data. This paper makes a distinction between ‘traditional’ determinants based on the motive for FDI and ‘transition-specific’ determinants. The empirical analysis contributes to earlier research by separating the transition economies into two groups, CEE and CIS countries. The CEE group consists of countries with a much higher GDP per capita than the CIS group, and this is reflected in the observation that the FDI flows to the CEE are primarily driven by a market-seeking motive while resource-seeking investment can explain the distribution of FDI among the CIS economies. This paper also concludes that transition performance and the choice of primary privatisation method are important in explaining FDI inflows to the transition economies. The analysis only finds weak evidence for efficiency-seeking FDI into the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Johnson, Andreas, 2006. "FDI inflows to the Transition Economies in Eastern Europe: Magnitude and Determinants," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 59, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0059
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcin Humanicki & Robert Kelm & Krzysztof Olszewski, 2013. "Foreign Direct Investment and Foreign Portfolio Investment in the contemporary globalized world: should they be still treated separately?," NBP Working Papers 167, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    2. Miroslav Mateev & Iliya Tsekov, 2014. "Are there any top FDI performers among EU-15 and CEE countries? A comparative panel data analysis," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 38(3), pages 337-374.
    3. Jacopo Torriti & Eka Ikpe, 2015. "Administrative costs of regulation and foreign direct investment: the Standard Cost Model in non-OECD countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(1), pages 127-144, February.
    4. Bardhyl Dauti, 2016. "Trade and foreign direct investment: Evidence from South East European countries and new European Union member states," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 34(1), pages 63-89.
    5. Bellak, Christian & Leibrecht, Markus & Riedl, Aleksandra, 2008. "Labour costs and FDI flows into Central and Eastern European Countries: A survey of the literature and empirical evidence," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 17-37, March.
    6. Malgorzata Jakubiak & Alina Kudina, 2008. "The Motives and Impediments to FDI in the CIS," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0370, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    7. David Dyker & Michael Emerson & Michael Gasiorek & Peter Holmes & Malgorzata Jakubiak & Andre Jungmittag & Vicki Korchagin & Alina Kudina & Evgeny Polyakov & Andrei Roudoi & Gevorg Torosyan, 2008. "Economic Feasibility, General Economic Impact and Implications of a Free Trade Agreement Between the European Union and Armenia," CASE Network Reports 0080, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Popovici Oana Cristina, 2015. "Assessing Fdi Determinants In Cee Countries During And After Transition," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 113-122, July.
    9. Annageldy Arazmuradov, 2012. "Foreign Aid, Foreign Direct Investment, and Domestic Investment Nexus in Landlocked Economies of Central Asia," Economic Research Guardian, Weissberg Publishing, vol. 2(1), pages 129-151, May.
    10. Václav Žďárek, 2009. "Moderní způsoby produkce a přímé zahraniční investice
      [Modern methods of production and foreign direct investment]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2009(4), pages 509-543.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    foreign direct investment; Eastern Europe; transition; privatisation;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform

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