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The Motives and Impediments to FDI in the CIS

  • Malgorzata Jakubiak
  • Alina Kudina
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    This paper examines the motives behind foreign direct investment (FDI) in a group of four CIS countries (Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan) based on a survey of 120 enterprises. The results indicate that non-oil multi-national enterprises (MNEs) are predominantly oriented at serving local markets. Most MNEs in the CIS operate as 'isolated players', maintaining strong links to their parent companies, while minimally cooperating with local CIS firms. The surveyed firms secure the majority of supplies from international sources. For this reason, the possibility for spillovers arising from cooperation with foreign-owned firms in the CIS is rather low at this time. The lack of efficiency-seeking investment poses further concern regarding the nature of FDI in the region. The most significant problems identified in the daily operations of the surveyed foreign firms are: the volatility of the political and economic environment, the ambiguity of the legal system and the high levels of corruption.

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    File URL: http://www.case-research.eu/upload/publikacja_plik/21937224_sa370.pdf
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    Paper provided by CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research in its series CASE Network Studies and Analyses with number 0370.

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    Length: 31 Pages
    Date of creation: 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:sec:cnstan:0370
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    1. Melanie Lansbury & Nigel Pain & Katerina Smidkova, 1996. "Foreign Direct Investment in Central Europe Since 1990: An Econometric Study," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 156(1), pages 104-114, May.
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    10. Beata Javorcik & Mariana Spatareanu, 2006. "To Share or Not To Share: Does Local Participation Matter for Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment?," Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark 2006-001, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark.
    11. Carstensen, Kai & Toubal, Farid, 2004. "Foreign direct investment in Central and Eastern European countries: A dynamic panel analysis," Munich Reprints in Economics 19965, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    12. Bevan, Alan A. & Estrin, Saul, 2004. "The determinants of foreign direct investment into European transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 775-787, December.
    13. Josef C. Brada & Ali M. Kutan & Taner M. Yigit, 2006. "The effects of transition and political instability on foreign direct investment inflows," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 14(4), pages 649-680, October.
    14. Yadong Luo & Mike W Peng, 1999. "Learning to Compete in a Transition Economy: Experience, Environment, and Performance," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 30(2), pages 269-295, June.
    15. Klaus Meyer, 2005. "Foreign Direct Investment in Emerging Economies," Papers Presented at Global Meetings of the Emerging Markets Forum 2005fdiee, Emerging Markets Forum.
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