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Foreign Direct Investment in Central Europe Since 1990: An Econometric Study

  • Melanie Lansbury

    (NIESR)

  • Nigel Pain

    (NIESR)

  • Katerina Smidkova

    (CNB)

FDI has become a importance source of external finance for several transitional economies, in particular those in Central Europe.The paper analyses determinants of FDI in Central Europe by providing econometric analysis. We examine the flows of FDI into the Czech and Slovak Federal Republics (CSFR), Hungary and Poland and attempt to explain both the factors that explain why foreign investors have moved into these markets so rapidly and why Hungary and the CSFR have attracted more FDI than Poland.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/mac/papers/0404/0404002.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Macroeconomics with number 0404002.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: 02 Apr 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0404002
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 11. The paper was published in the National Institute Economic Review in May 1996.
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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  1. Richard E. Baldwin & Rikard Forslid & Jan Haaland, 1995. "Investment Creation and Investment Diversion: Simulation Analysis of theSingle Market Programme," NBER Working Papers 5364, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. James R. Markusen, 1995. "The Boundaries of Multinational Enterprises and the Theory of International Trade," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 169-189, Spring.
  3. Cantwell, John, 1995. "The Globalisation of Technology: What Remains of the Product Cycle Model?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 155-74, February.
  4. Barrell, Ray & Pain, Nigel, 1999. "Trade restraints and Japanese direct investment flows," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 29-45, January.
  5. Ann Harrison & Ana Revenga, 1995. "The Effects of Trade Policy Reform: What Do We Really Know?," NBER Working Papers 5225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Leamer, Edward E. & Levinsohn, James, 1995. "International trade theory: The evidence," Handbook of International Economics, in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 26, pages 1339-1394 Elsevier.
  7. Wheeler, David & Mody, Ashoka, 1992. "International investment location decisions : The case of U.S. firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1-2), pages 57-76, August.
  8. Drábek, Zdenek & Smith, Alasdair, 1995. "Trade Performance and Trade Policy in Central and Eastern Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 1182, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Gual, Jordi & Martín, Carmela, 1994. "Trade and Foreign Direct Investment with Central and Eastern Europe: Its Impact on Spain," CEPR Discussion Papers 1006, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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