IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The effects of transition and political instability on foreign direct investment inflows


  • Josef C. Brada
  • Ali M. Kutan
  • Taner M. Yigit


This paper examines the effects of transition and of political instability on foreign direct investment (FDI) flows to the transition economies of Central Europe, the Baltics and the Balkans. We find that FDI flows to transition economies unaffected by conflict and political instability exceed those that would be expected for comparable West European countries. Success with stabilization and reform increased the volume of FDI inflows. In the case of Balkan counties, conflict and instability reduced FDI inflows below what one would expect for comparable West European countries, and reform and stabilization failures further reduced FDI to the region. Thus, we find that the economic costs of instability in the Balkans in terms of foregone FDI have been quite high. Copyright (c) 2006 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2006 The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development..

Suggested Citation

  • Josef C. Brada & Ali M. Kutan & Taner M. Yigit, 2006. "The effects of transition and political instability on foreign direct investment inflows," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 14(4), pages 649-680, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:14:y:2006:i:4:p:649-680

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Beata K. Smarzynska & Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "Corruption and Composition of Foreign Direct Investment: Firm-Level Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7969, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Singh, Harinder & Kwang W. Jun, 1995. "Some new evidence on determinants of foreign direct investment in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1531, The World Bank.
    3. Smarzynska, Beata K. & Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "Corruption and the composition of foreign direct investment - firm-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2360, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Josef C. Brada & Vladimír Tomšík, 2009. "The Foreign Direct Investment Financial Life Cycle: Evidence of Macroeconomic Effects from Transition Economies," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 5-20, May.
    2. Tuomas A. Peltonen & Ricardo M. Sousa & Isabel S. Vansteenkiste, 2011. "Fundamentals, Financial Factors, and the Dynamics of Investment in Emerging Markets," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 47(0), pages 88-105, May.
    3. repec:scn:vgmu00:2017:i:4:p:173-206 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Amat Adarov & Mario Holzner & Luka Sikic, 2016. "Backwardness, Industrialisation and Economic Development in Europe," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 123, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    5. Rosa Capolupo, 2012. "Economic Transition and Regional Growth: The Case of Albania and Comparator SEECs," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 18(3), pages 529-549, March.
    6. Ugur Karakaplan & Bilin Neyapti & Selin Sayek, 2005. "Aid and Foreign Direct Investment: International Evidence," Working Papers 2005/12, Turkish Economic Association.
    7. Malgorzata Jakubiak & Alina Kudina, 2008. "The Motives and Impediments to FDI in the CIS," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0370, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    8. El-hadj Bah & Josef C. Brada, 2014. "Labor Markets in the Transition Economies: An Overview," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 11(1), pages 3-53, June.
    9. repec:nos:vgmu00:2017:i:4:p:173-206 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Tesfaye A. Gebremedhin & Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2013. "Immigration and Political Instability," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 317-341, August.
    11. Josef C. Brada & Vladimír Tomšík, 2009. "The Foreign Direct Investment Financial Life Cycle: Evidence of Macroeconomic Effects from Transition Economies," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 45(3), pages 5-20, May.
    12. Mirel-Daniel Simionescu, 2017. "Determinants of Foreign Direct Investments in Bulgaria and Romania in the Context of Recent Economic Crisis," Academic Journal of Economic Studies, Faculty of Finance, Banking and Accountancy Bucharest,"Dimitrie Cantemir" Christian University Bucharest, vol. 3(1), pages 68-72, March.
    13. Vida Patrik, 2016. "The Potential of Biotechnology Investments in Selected Eastern European Countries: Lost Chances," Business Systems Research, De Gruyter Open, vol. 7(1), pages 16-34, March.
    14. Arfan Shahzad & Abdullah Kaid Al-Swidi & Dawood Ali Mithani & Faudziah Hanim Bt Fadzil & Abd Ghani Bin Golamuddin, 2012. "An Empirical Investigation on The Effect of Business Environment Factors on The FDI Inflows in Pakistan: The Moderating Role of Political Stability," Business and Economic Research, Macrothink Institute, vol. 2(2), pages 156-170, December.
    15. repec:eee:iburev:v:27:y:2018:i:1:p:139-148 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:14:y:2006:i:4:p:649-680. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.