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Nuclear waste storage and environmental intergenerational externalities

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  • Mouez Fodha

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, LEO - Laboratoire d'économie d'Orleans - UO - Université d'Orléans - Université de Tours - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This article analyzes the long-term consequences of nuclear waste storage within a general equilibrium framework. The objective is to determine the conditions for which the storage of waste, and thus the transfer of externalities towards the future, can be optimal. These conditions could explain the implementation of intergenerational externalities, justifying an intertemporal Not In My Back Yard behaviour. We first show that the choice of the policy instruments determines the feasibility of the storage policy. Indeed, economic stability imposes precise levels of the rate of storage or of the tax rate, making it possible to avoid chaotic economic dynamics. Under these specific conditions, and depending on the period at which an accident may occur and on the value of the social discount rate, we show that storing all the nuclear waste may be optimal.

Suggested Citation

  • Mouez Fodha, 2015. "Nuclear waste storage and environmental intergenerational externalities," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" insu-01105358, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:pseose:insu-01105358
    DOI: 10.1504/IJSD.2015.066792
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-insu.archives-ouvertes.fr/insu-01105358
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    Keywords

    Q58; Q53; Overlapping Generations Model; Nuclear Waste; Environmental Externalities JEL Classifications: O13;

    JEL classification:

    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • E - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics

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