IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hal/journl/hal-00676229.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Power laws and comparative advantage

Author

Listed:
  • Jeroen Hinloopen

    () (ASE - University of Amsterdam)

  • Charles Van Marrewijk

    () (Utrecht School of Economics - Utrecht University [Utrecht])

Abstract

Using a comprehensive international trade data set we document empirical power laws for the distribution of the interaction between countries as measured by revealed comparative advantage. Using the recently developed estimator by Gabaix and Ibragimov (forthcoming) we find strong evidence in favor of power laws along the time, country, and sector dimension for three different levels of data aggregation. This finding is not predicted by any of the existing trade theories. The estimated power law exponents characterizing the distribution of revealed comparative advantage are stable over time but differ between countries and sectors. These differences are related empirically to country and sector characteristics, including population size, GDP, and factor intensities.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeroen Hinloopen & Charles Van Marrewijk, 2011. "Power laws and comparative advantage," Post-Print hal-00676229, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00676229
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2010.543079
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00676229
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00676229/document
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mary Amiti, 1999. "Specialization patterns in Europe," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 135(4), pages 573-593, December.
    2. Colin Carter & Xianghong Li, 2004. "Changing trade patterns in major OECD countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(14), pages 1501-1511.
    3. Duncan Black & Vernon Henderson, 2003. "Urban evolution in the USA," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(4), pages 343-372, October.
    4. Carlos Cortinhas, 2007. "Intra-industry trade and business cycles in ASEAN," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(7), pages 893-902.
    5. Ricardo, David, 1821. "On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, edition 3, number ricardo1821.
    6. Simon J. Evenett & Wolfgang Keller, 2002. "On Theories Explaining the Success of the Gravity Equation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 281-316, April.
    7. A. E. Akinlo, 2008. "A cost function analysis of import demand for Nigeria," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(22), pages 2911-2920.
    8. Harald Badinger, 2007. "Market size, trade, competition and productivity: evidence from OECD manufacturing industries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(17), pages 2143-2157.
    9. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Harry P. Bowen, 1997. "World Trade Flows, 1970-1992, with Production and Tariff Data," NBER Working Papers 5910, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Ethier, Wilfred J, 1982. "National and International Returns to Scale in the Modern Theory of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 389-405, June.
    11. Anderson, T. W. & Hsiao, Cheng, 1982. "Formulation and estimation of dynamic models using panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 47-82, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i:1:p:61-92 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:kap:empiri:v:45:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10663-016-9362-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Steven Brakman & Charles Van Marrewijk, 2017. "A closer look at revealed comparative advantage: Gross-versus value-added trade flows," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96(1), pages 61-92, March.
    4. Maureen Lankhuizen & Thomas De Graaff & Henri De Groot, 2012. "Product Heterogeneity, Intangible Barriers & Distance Decay: The effect of multiple dimensions of distance on trade across different product categories," ERSA conference papers ersa12p151, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Michal Brzezinski, 2016. "Robust estimation of the Pareto tail index: a Monte Carlo analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 1-30, August.
    6. Maureen B. M. Lankhuizen & Thomas De Graaff & Henri L. F. de Groot, 2015. "Product Heterogeneity, Intangible Barriers and Distance Decay: The Effect of Multiple Dimensions of Distance on Trade across Different Product Categories," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 137-159, June.
    7. Michał Brzeziński, 2013. "Robust estimation of the Pareto index: A Monte Carlo Analysis," Working Papers 2013-32, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Sciences & Humanities;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00676229. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CCSD). General contact details of provider: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.