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The impact of external shocks on the eurozone: a structural VAR model

Author

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  • Jean-Baptiste Gossé

    () (CEPN - Centre d'Economie de l'Université Paris Nord - UP13 - Université Paris 13 - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Cyriac Guillaumin

    () (CREG - Centre de recherche en économie de Grenoble - UPMF - Université Pierre Mendès France - Grenoble 2 - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes)

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of the main external shocks which the eurozone and member states have undergone since the start of the 2000s. Such shocks have been monetary (drop in global interest rates), financial (two stock market crises) and real (rising oil prices and an accumulation of global current account imbalances). We have used a structural VAR (SVAR) methodology, on the basis of which we have defined four structural shocks: external, supply, demand and monetary. The estimates obtained using SVAR models enabled us to determine the impact of these shocks on the eurozone and its member countries. The study highlights the diversity of reactions inside the eurozone. The repercussions of the oil and monetary shocks were fairly similar in all eurozone countries - excepting the Netherlands and the United Kingdom - but financial crises and global imbalances have had very different effects. External shocks explain one-fifth of the growth differential and current account balance variance and about one-third of fluctuations in the real effective exchange rate in Europe. The impact of the oil crisis was particularly large, but it pushed the euro down. Global imbalances explain a large proportion of exchange rate fluctuations but drove the euro up. Furthermore the response functions to financial and monetary crises are similar, except for current account functions. A financial crisis seems to result in the withdrawal of larger volumes of assets than a monetary crisis. The study thus highlights the diversity of the reactions in the eurozone and shows that external shocks do more to explain variations in the real effective exchange rate than in the growth differential or current account, while underlining the particularly important part played by global imbalances in European exchange rate fluctuations.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Baptiste Gossé & Cyriac Guillaumin, 2011. "The impact of external shocks on the eurozone: a structural VAR model," CEPN Working Papers hal-00610024, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cepnwp:hal-00610024
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00610024
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    exogeneity hypothesis; global imbalances; current account; eurozone; structural VAR model; contemporary and long-term restrictions; external shock; exogeneity hypothesis.;

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