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Making Large Classes Small(er): Assessing the Effectiveness Of a Hybrid Teaching Technology

Author

Listed:
  • Barb Bloemhof

    () (Department of Economics and BHSc Program, McMaster University)

  • John Livernois

    () (Department of Economics and Finance, University of Guelph)

Abstract

This paper examines learning outcomes in a one-semester introductory microeconomics course where contact time with the instructor was reduced by two-thirds and students were expected to view pre-recorded lectures on-line and come to class prepared to engage in discussion. Students were pre-and post-tested using the Test of Understanding in College Economics (TUCE - 4). Learning outcomes as measured by the change in test scores are found to be as good as or better than calibrating data for groups assessed using the TUCE - 4. In addition to being a more enjoyable course for the instructor, the course design can be part of a more self-directed curriculum that uses available resources more efficiently to achieve similar learning objectives to a lecture-based introductory course.

Suggested Citation

  • Barb Bloemhof & John Livernois, 2011. "Making Large Classes Small(er): Assessing the Effectiveness Of a Hybrid Teaching Technology," Working Papers 1111, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:gue:guelph:2011-11
    as

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    File URL: http://www.uoguelph.ca/economics/sites/uoguelph.ca.economics/files/2011-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Schwerdt, Guido & Wuppermann, Amelie C., 2011. "Is traditional teaching really all that bad? A within-student between-subject approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 365-379, April.
    2. Siegfried, John J & Fels, Rendigs, 1979. "Research on Teaching College Economics: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 923-969, September.
    3. Dobkin, Carlos & Gil, Ricard & Marion, Justin, 2010. "Skipping class in college and exam performance: Evidence from a regression discontinuity classroom experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 566-575, August.
    4. Sims, David P., 2009. "Crowding Peter to educate Paul: Lessons from a class size reduction externality," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 465-473, August.
    5. Siegfried, John J, et al, 1991. "The Economics Major: Can and Should We Do Better Than a B Minus?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 20-25, May.
    6. J J Arias & Douglas M. Walker, 2004. "Additional Evidence on the Relationship between Class Size and Student Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 311-329, October.
    7. Bedard, Kelly & Kuhn, Peter, 2008. "Where class size really matters: Class size and student ratings of instructor effectiveness," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 253-265, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    active learning; assessment; computer-assisted instruction; introductory microeconomics;

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate

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