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Choosing in a Large World: The Role of Focal Points as a Mindshaping Device

Author

Listed:
  • Lauren Larrouy

    (Université Côte d'Azur
    GREDEG CNRS)

  • Guilhem Lecouteux

    (Université Côte d'Azur
    GREDEG CNRS)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to offer a theory of coordination that considers the role of the context within which the individuals interact, and to develop a rigorous analysis of salience and focal points. This requires dealing with how agents choose in ‘large worlds’ (in Savage’s sense). We highlight the role of mindshaping in the formation of individual preferences and beliefs and show how social focal points can generate prior beliefs. We conclude by discussing normative implications of our analysis, since it suggests that agents are socially-embedded entities, whose preferences and beliefs are shaped by social dynamics and norms.

Suggested Citation

  • Lauren Larrouy & Guilhem Lecouteux, 2018. "Choosing in a Large World: The Role of Focal Points as a Mindshaping Device," GREDEG Working Papers 2018-29, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:gre:wpaper:2018-29
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    coordination; mindshaping; belief formation; preference formation; large world;

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty

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