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Can Pakistan have creative cities? An agent based modeling approach with preliminary application to Karachi:

Author

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  • Malik, Ammar A.
  • Crooks, Andrew T.
  • Root, Hilton L.

Abstract

The form and function of many cities are increasingly marred by congestion, sprawl and socioeconomic segregation, preventing them from experiencing expected productivity gains associated with urbanization. We operationalize these insights by creating a stylized agent-based model of a theoretical city, inspired by social complexity theory and the new urban literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Malik, Ammar A. & Crooks, Andrew T. & Root, Hilton L., 2013. "Can Pakistan have creative cities? An agent based modeling approach with preliminary application to Karachi:," PSSP working papers 13, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:psspwp:13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    urban areas; urban population;

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